Mike McBirney / Monarch Butterflies In the Pacific Northwest Facebook Page

A butterfly, born and raised in the Treasure Valley, has flown all the way to the Pacific coast.

The monarch, nicknamed Monet, is part of a Washington State University study that tags and follows the winged invertebrates during their life cycle.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Images

Tuesday, President Trump unveiled his long-awaited $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. But in order to streamline these projects, the administration is proposing changes to the way they are reviewed for environmental impact.

The National Environmental Policy Act was enacted in 1970. Called NEPA for short, the law was created after the construction of the Interstate Highways System damaged delicate ecosystems around the country.


The last time we checked in with Boise filmmaker Matthew Podolsky in July, he said time was running out for the vaquita.

Idaho Power Company

2017 was a good year for White Sturgeon in the middle fork of the Snake River. But a changing climate may mean years like that one will be harder to find.

Snake River Alliance

Last year, we told you about a program designed to get more people to put solar panels on their roof. The program called its second year successful, but it’s not clear if it'll continue.

David Gassel / Idaho Fish and Game

A picture is worth ... 9.04 pounds.

In this case, Meridian fisherman Dave Gassel reeled in this largescale sucker and broke the record in Idaho. He pulled the fish out of Lake Cascade.

Rocky Barker / Idaho Statesman

During the 1970 gubernatorial race, Democrat Cecil Andrus made saving Castle Peak from mining a key issue in his campaign.

John Robison / Idaho Conservation League

Justin Hayes says he would rather not experience this kind of déjà vu.

“Having a mining company upstream flaunting environmental laws and discharging arsenic into the Boise River is really not acceptable,” says the Idaho Conservation League Program Director.

City of Boise

Apparently, there was a lot of pent-up demand for composting.

Wild Lens

Local filmmakers, who are making a movie about the plight of a critically endangered sea mammal, say there are now likely less than 25 of the animals left in the Gulf of California.

Boise filmmaker Matthew Podolsky started documenting the story of the small, dolphin-like vaquita over two years ago. Since he learned the animals were dying in gill nets he’s been telling their story in short films. He’s watched the number of remaining vaquita continue to drop each year.

Boise Parks and Recreation Department

It’s been a year since last June’s Table Rock Fire in the Boise Foothills destroyed 2,500 acres of wildlife habitat. Sparked by illegal fireworks, the blaze burned and blackened the sagebrush-covered landscape. Over the last 12 months, a group of people and agencies have worked to restore the area.

Martha Brabec says she’s seeing progress when she travels through the burn area. As Boise Parks and Recreation’s Foothills Restoration Specialist, she’s on the front lines of the fire recovery effort.

Rita Poe/Estate of Rita Poe / via AP Photo

Nancy Zingheim barely knew Rita Poe when Poe approached her office at a Washington state RV park. Poe, a shy registered nurse, had a request for the RV park business manager: Could Zingheim help her with her will?

Weeks later, the 66-year-old Poe died of colorectal cancer. In her will, she left nearly $800,000 to a dozen national wildlife refuges and parks, mostly in the American West. She named Zingheim the executor.

Mark Davis

As the weather turns toward summer, bee colonies in Idaho are starting to expand. Every year, old colonies split away from the hive and go looking for a new home. It’s called Honey Bee Swarming and it happens from March through August.

Mark Davis says this year’s swarming is getting a late start, because of all the wet weather. Known as Treasure Valley’s “Bee Man,” Davis is the founder of the nonprofit, family-based Treasure Valley Bee Rescue, a group that will relocate swarms rather than exterminating them.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife / Associated Press

Oregon’s Fish and Wildlife Department is holding a second hearing on a wolf plan Friday in Portland. The plan is unpopular with ranchers and wolf supporters alike.

Oregon didn’t have documented wolves before 2005. Since then, thanks to the animals crossing over the border from Idaho, Oregon now has 11 packs, totaling at least 112 wolves. Twelve years ago, the state adopted a plan to manage the wolves but wants to revise it now that the population is growing.

The Peregrine Fund/Bosch WebCam

The Peregrine Fund announced this week that four American Kestrel eggs have hatched in the well-watched nest in Boise. It is the sixth year the birds have raised a family live on a webcam.

The female laid the first egg on March 27 and four other eggs slowly followed. Usually eggs are laid every other day but the Peregrine Fund says a storm slowed the process down this year. After some fits and starts, four of the five eggs hatched over the weekend.