Film Festival

Travis Estvold

Over the weekend, Idaho filmmaking teams were given 48 hours to put together a short film for the 14th annual i48 film competition and festival.

The statewide film competition and festival is an annual event that brings together teams of filmmakers of all levels. Founder of i-48, Andrew Ellis, channeled his passion for film into creating this timed event in 2004.

 

Films about nature and conservation in Idaho, the West and around the world are the focus of this year’s Les Bois Film Festival.

The Land Trust of the Treasure Valley and the film company Wild Lens are showing 20 films that highlight everything from kestrels to elk to Bogus Basin’s 75th anniversary to black footed ferrets.

Julia Rundberg is with the Land Trust. She says it’s a locally-sourced, homegrown, free-range, family-friendly, nature film festival.

Screenshot / Wild Lens Vimeo

A new film festival to celebrate the conservation community in Idaho and around the globe will be held Saturday night in Boise. The goal is to inspire viewers to get outside and help the land.

A film from a high school student in Victor, Idaho and a local film about ranchers making room for sage grouse are just some of the stories in the Les Bois Film Festival. Viewers will also see conservation films from Borneo and Singapore.

Photo provided by Reed Lindsay

Baseball is known as America’s pastime. But a short documentary by Idaho-born filmmaker Reed Lindsay might make you question if another country is more deserving of this title. 

 

Karen Day

Last April, we told you the story of one Idaho woman filmmaker struggling to make a documentary about a pioneer of Idaho filmmaking.

Joanna Lipper

The eighth-annual Family of Woman Film Festival begins Monday in Sun Valley. Three new documentaries will be shown throughout the week, all centered around the theme "women and their dreams."

Peggy Elliott Goldwyn founded the film festival in 2008. Goldwyn — who has deep connections to Hollywood and the indie film world — says she started the multi-day event with a feminist mission.

Glenn Landberg / Treefort Music Fest

The Treefort Film Fest is prepping to bring a diverse batch of movies to Boise March 25-29. As part of the annual Treefort Music Fest, the multi-day event will highlight indie short and feature films that don't get a lot of mainstream attention.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s something breathtaking about watching a real-life cowboy ride his horse through this green pasture near McCall, Idaho.

This Roy Rogers – not the 50’s era icon – is Alan Heathcock’s version of the star. The actor pulls the reigns gently, swings to the ground, and saunters over to a young man leaning half-dazed against an aspen tree.  

"Hey, Vernon," he says.

"Hey Roy. She's a hot one, ain't she?" asks the young man.

"It's hotter than a bull's breath out here."  

Matthew Wordell

Last June was a big month for Cody Gittings and Stephen Heleker. For one, the Boise filmmakers formed a media company shortly after Gittings graduated from Boise State. And two, the pair received the green light to pursue their most ambitious project yet: turning “Smoke,” a story by local author and professor Alan Heathcock – into a short film.

The Family of Woman Film Festival is underway in Sun Valley. One documentary that will be shown this weekend comes from Nisha Pahuja, a filmmaker who splits her time between India and Toronto. Her film, “The World Before Her,” looks at two different groups of women.

Courtesy of Family of Woman Film Festival

Most of the films you’ll see this weekend at the Family of Woman Film Festival in Sun Valley come from overseas. The festival will feature films from Egypt, Democratic Republic of Congo, and India. Only one film comes from the U.S. The Invisible War, which exposed the sexual assaults in the U.S. military. That documentary was recently nominated for an Academy Award.