Films

Joanna Lipper

The eighth-annual Family of Woman Film Festival begins Monday in Sun Valley. Three new documentaries will be shown throughout the week, all centered around the theme "women and their dreams."

Peggy Elliott Goldwyn founded the film festival in 2008. Goldwyn — who has deep connections to Hollywood and the indie film world — says she started the multi-day event with a feminist mission.

This post was updated on April 21. 

Filmmaker Karen Day says she made her Kickstarter goal, with 12 hours to spare. Day needed $26,000 to wrap up editing and finish up the documentary,Nell Shipman: The Girl From God's Country.” She beat that goal, by $360. 

Day says, “We made it! Now, onward to post production!”

Original story was posted April 18.

The French drama Blue is the Warmest Color opens in U.S. theaters October 25, but you won’t be able to watch it in Idaho, at least not on the big screen.  

Films like this one would usually find a home at The Flicks Theatre, but not this time. 

Carole Skinner, who owns the Flicks, told The Hollywood Reporter, “It isn’t because we’re prudes.”

Maureen O'Hara
Courtesy of Johnny Nicoletti

The woman who starred in such films as the Miracle on 34th Street and Parent Trap celebrates her birthday today in Boise. You can see some of Maureen O’Hara’s most popular films at the Egyptian Theatre throughout the day and then dine with the actress at a benefit dinner.

O’Hara’s biographer and manager Johnny Nicoletti says her 93 birthday celebration came together after a trip in May to visit the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset, Iowa. 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Bronwyn Leslie is a busy woman. The Boise actor and musician was recently awarded a $5,000 grant from the Idaho Film Office to produce a documentary about Lyda Southard, the famous Idaho serial killer.

Southard lived in Twin Falls around the turn of the 20th century. She is thought to have poisoned five men -- including four of her husbands -- for the insurance money.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

This time last year, Boise author Alan Heathcock gave two of his former students the green light to turn one of his stories into a film. Now, that film has wrapped up production. Here are some of the people behind the filming of Smoke.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s something breathtaking about watching a real-life cowboy ride his horse through this green pasture near McCall, Idaho.

This Roy Rogers – not the 50’s era icon – is Alan Heathcock’s version of the star. The actor pulls the reigns gently, swings to the ground, and saunters over to a young man leaning half-dazed against an aspen tree.  

"Hey, Vernon," he says.

"Hey Roy. She's a hot one, ain't she?" asks the young man.

"It's hotter than a bull's breath out here."  

Matthew Wordell

Two Boise filmmakers will call it a wrap Saturday after a week of filming in southern Idaho. Earlier this year, Cody Gittings and Stephen Heleker raised money to produce a film version of Alan Heathcock’s short story, “Smoke.”

Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

Organizers of the Sun Valley Film Festival are calling this year’s event a success. Ticket sales nearly doubled from last year and eight awards were given to filmmakers.

Director Sean Baker received the Festival’s highest honor, the Vision Award, for his film Starlet. It’s about an unlikely friendship between a young aspiring actress and an elderly widow. 

Hollywood Comes To Sun Valley For Film Festival

Mar 15, 2013
Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

Sun Valley is no stranger to film. Several movies have been shot in the Wood River Valley, including 1985’s “Pale Rider” starring Clint Eastwood.  Last year, after finishing his latest story, screenwriter Ted Grennan came up with an idea that would add to the local film scene.    

“I really didn’t know what I was going to do next and a friend called and I said ‘What about a film festival in Sun Valley,’ and he said ‘there are film festivals everywhere.’ And I said ‘there is not one in Sun Valley’ and he said you might be on to something,” explains Grennan.

Courtesy of the Sun Valley Film Festival

The Sun Valley Film Festival gets underway today with its first ever Screenwriters Lab. Writer and actor Will McCormack will lead the three hour discussion.  You might recognize McCormack from a few appearances on the Sopranos or the film Syriana. 

But lately this actor turned screenwriter is best known for his breakout movie Celeste and Jesse Forever. He wrote that film with Rashida Jones who appears on the sitcom Parks and Recreation.

Matthew Wordell

Last June was a big month for Cody Gittings and Stephen Heleker. For one, the Boise filmmakers formed a media company shortly after Gittings graduated from Boise State. And two, the pair received the green light to pursue their most ambitious project yet: turning “Smoke,” a story by local author and professor Alan Heathcock – into a short film.

It’s hard to imagine the U.S. with just a few dozen doctors to help everyone. But in the country of South Sudan that is the reality. There are 50 licensed doctors to help more than eight million people. Thomas Burke knows this situation well. He’s the chief of the Division of Global Health and Human Rights. That’s part of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He’s helped create a medical program for 400 students.