Fish

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

When you order that special filet at a restaurant or store, you're often going on trust that the fish actually is what the menu or label says it is. In Washington, two state agencies are asking for tougher penalties to deter seafood fraud.


OLYMPIA, Wash. - When you order that special filet at a restaurant or store, you're often going on trust that the fish actually is what the menu or label says it is. In Washington, two state agencies are asking for tougher penalties to deter seafood fraud.


Investigators for Consumer Reports recently found more than one-fifth of the fish they submitted for DNA identification was mislabeled at the point of sale.


Washington Fish and Wildlife police deputy chief Mike Cenci says the penalties for false labeling need to be stronger.

Working For Idaho's Extinct Coho Salmon

Dec 7, 2012
Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

The Northwest’s declining salmon runs have spurred marathon legal battles and inspired billions in spending to save the iconic species.

But Idaho’s coho salmon were never listed as endangered before they went extinct in 1987. Few people noticed when the fish were gone. But the Nez Perce Indian tribe did. And thanks to its extraordinary efforts, coho are once again returning by the thousands to Idaho waters.

Two-Headed Trout Leads to Scrutiny of Mine Pollution

Apr 19, 2012
J.R. Simplot/Idaho DEQ

Here’s an image you usually don’t see without the help of Photoshop: two-headed fish.  Pictures of deformed baby trout with two heads show up in a study of creeks in a remote part of southeast Idaho.  The study examined the effects of a contaminant called selenium.  It comes from a nearby mine owned by the Boise-based agribusiness giant, J.R. Simplot.  Critics say the two-headed trout have implications beyond a couple of Idaho creeks. 

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