The Flicks

Travis Estvold

Over the weekend, Idaho filmmaking teams were given 48 hours to put together a short film for the 14th annual i48 film competition and festival.

The statewide film competition and festival is an annual event that brings together teams of filmmakers of all levels. Founder of i-48, Andrew Ellis, channeled his passion for film into creating this timed event in 2004.

 

Columbia Pictures

Prior to showing 'A River Runs Through It' in 1992, The Flicks in downtown Boise wasn't making much of a profit.

Thanks to a chance meeting at the Morrison Center between The Flicks owner Carole Skinner and Robert Redford, the film's director, the theater was able to obtain permission from Columbia Pictures to show the film. The weekend premiere of the movie attracted a record-breaking audience and jump-started a loyal following The Flicks would carry on for years to come.

The French drama Blue is the Warmest Color opens in U.S. theaters October 25, but you won’t be able to watch it in Idaho, at least not on the big screen.  

Films like this one would usually find a home at The Flicks Theatre, but not this time. 

Carole Skinner, who owns the Flicks, told The Hollywood Reporter, “It isn’t because we’re prudes.”

Sarah_Ackerman / Flickr

In the wake of the movie theater shooting in Colorado, theater owners have to consider something many have given little thought to in the past, security. One big company, AMC Theaters said Friday it will ban costumes and masks from its 300 plus movie houses. Regal Entertainment, which owns Boise's largest theater, says moviegoers should expect stricter controls over character attire and accessories. And the National Association of Theater Owners says it’s reviewing all security procedures.