Flood Insurance

FEMA, Idaho Clash Over Flood Insurance Law

Nov 1, 2017
Idaho Fish and Game

The state of Idaho and the Federal government are trying to work out an agreement to avoid jeopardizing flood insurance in the state.


FEMA

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is holding hearings on proposed flood maps in Ada and Canyon County.

FEMA has come up with new maps that change the outline of the 100-year floodplain. That’s the area that has a 1 percent chance of flooding in any year.

The maps are preliminary and include areas along the Boise River, Nine Mile Creek, Mill Slough and Willow Creek. Hundreds of homes in Boise, Garden City, Eagle and Star fall inside the new floodplain districts proposed by FEMA.

Rick Strack / Boise State Public Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) released new floodplain maps. Those revisions could impact some Treasure Valley residents.

The new maps cover parts of Ada and Canyon Counties.

The floodplain is an area that has a one percent chance of being inundated each year. The new maps chart areas facing the risk of being overrun with water along the Boise River, Nine Mile Creek and Willow Creek among others.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Thousands more people in the Treasure Valley may be required to buy flood insurance in the near future.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is revising its floodplain maps for the Boise River, and a lot of neighborhoods near the river could be added, requiring more home and business owners to buy potentially costly flood insurance.

Barbara Horne's neighborhood in Eagle is one of those. Horne walks her dog around the pond behind her house.  The pair could reach the Boise River in five minutes. Despite living so close to the river, Horne does not have flood insurance.

About 1,400 flood insurance policies in Idaho subsidized by the government are facing hefty premium increases despite a congressional fix intended to limit the worse of the rate hikes.

More than a million policyholders across the nation will be required to pay higher annual premiums as the federal government cuts subsidies in an effort to cover the National Flood Insurance Program's more than $24 billion deficit brought about by the discounts and a series of catastrophic storms.