Food

Idaho Tourism

Long-time Boiseans remember when downtown was a ghost town by 10 p.m. These days, BoDo after midnight is alive with food and revelry. We take a look at what's going on downtown after the witching hour.

Boise State University

Boise State University's Owen McDougal has been researching how acralymides develop in cooked foods. Acralymides can have carcinogenic effects on the human body and in California, a judge recently ruled coffee growers need to label the acralymide content of their beans. Idaho Matters will talk with McDougal about his work on acralymides and potatoes.

Stock | Rex-Shutterstock | Disney/Lucasfilm | 20th Cent. Fox/The Walt Disney Company | Universal Pictures | Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

  • A round-up of the week's news.
  • Studying the carcinogenic effects of food.
  • A visit to the box office for this summer's blockbusters.

Classic Film / Flickr

Funeral potatoes have gone mainstream. The word on the crunchy, cheesy and gooey casserole has gotten out. Walmart is selling a frozen version of the dish – and the internet is freaking out.

Roger Doughty

When it comes to cookbooks, most of them line up the familiar grouping of recipes – breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert and maybe a cooking tip or two. But one new local cookbook looks less at straight-ahead recipes and more at practical cooking techniques.

Lynn Friedman / Flickr Creative Commons

If you have a tree overflowing with fruit or a garden that needs some culling, a new website in the Treasure Valley could help you out.

Like any adventure centering on fried food, this one starts at a posh restaurant in Boise where the head chef has twice been nominated for a James Beard Award, commonly referred to as the “Oscar of cooking.”

Representative Bryan Zollinger / Facebook

Tuesday, Idaho Governor Butch Otter vetoed a bill to repeal the six percent sales tax on groceries. Wednesday, two lawmakers said that veto was invalid and the repeal now becomes law.

GOP Representatives Ron Nate and Bryan Zollinger say Governor Butch Otter’s veto came too late to be valid.

 

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

The Treasure Valley Food Coalition this week is asking the question, “why should we save farmland in Idaho?” As growth and development spread across the Treasure Valley, the coalition is starting a conversation about preserving farmland in places like Canyon County.

Travis Nep Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

A restaurant in Meridian hasn't just cut prices, they've eliminated them, allowing customers to pay what they want for their food.

KTVB-TV reports that the Bread of Life Community Deli allows customers to pay what they can, and if they can't pay anything they can still eat.

I-5 Design and Manufacture / Flickr Creative Commons

I shop at Albertsons a few times a week. I live near one and there are two close to our radio studio. I’ll pop over in the evening or on weekends to pick up a few things. Granted, my market research is light-years from being scientific, but on those trips I’ve noticed a couple of things that have made me less than optimistic for the future of this hometown company. 

One, it’s never crowded compared to the store where I go for my big, once-a-week shopping trips. And two, like me, everyone there seems to be buying just a few things.  

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Boise-based Albertsons filed this week to offer stock for public sale. Albertsons became one of the largest food retailers in the country early this year when it closed on its acquisition of Safeway. 

Your Guide To Idaho Summer Fruit

Jun 11, 2015
Sebastian Mary / Flickr Creative Commons

No one would ever call me a foodie and I’m certainly no locavore. I tend to eat whatever is in front of me. But I have one big exception: fruit, especially nectarines and peaches. I’ve just got to have that sweet nectar of the nectarine when it's fresh. So, in late summer I embark on a quest looking for fresh, local nectarines and peaches.

Barry Crabtree / Flickr Creative Commons

During a talk he gave in Oxford, England in 2013, environmentalist and writer Mark Lynas apologized to the very audience he used to demonize: companies and scientists that work with genetically modified foods.

"As an environmentalist and someone who believes that everyone in this world has a right to a health and nutritious diet of their choosing," Lynas told the crowd, "I could not have chosen a more counterproductive path and I now regret it completely."

Of all the things you're considering for your next meal today, bugs are probably not on the menu.

Pages