Gary Moncrief

Idaho Press-Tribune via Idaho State Police via AP

As state lawmakers sift through the nearly 400 bills introduced this session, two of them have been moving quickly, but quietly, through the chambers.

Troy Maben / AP Photo

More than 400 bills are working their way through the Idaho Legislature in what has been a very busy week for lawmakers.

stefan klocek / Flickr

Week five of the Idaho Legislature saw a lot of action in committees and on the House Floor. Big ticket issues were addressed, including a combination tax cut and tax conformity bill.

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

Week four of the 2018 Idaho Legislature has come to a close. This first month is typically a time when more and more bills are introduced by lawmakers and when public testimony starts to heat up in committees.

Tom Kelly/Flickr

It’s the end of the third week of the Idaho Legislature. As legislators wrap up some housekeeping tasks that are necessary at the start of the session, bills are beginning to be introduced. And the next few weeks will see the bulk of the legislation for this session coming forward.

AP

This week, a proposed bill that would have required lawmakers to disclose their finances to the public, was overwhelmingly voted down in the Idaho Legislature.

Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Legislature has drafted its first bill for the 2018 session and it concerns a familiar issue from last year.

Kimberlee Kruesi / AP Photo

Money, power, humility and budgets - that’s this week’s episode of “Legislative Breakdown.” In this week's podcast, Samantha Wright and Boise State Political Science Professor Gary Moncrief are joined by special guest, co-chair of the powerful Joint Finance Appropriations Committee, Representative Maxine Bell of Jerome.

Butch Otter
State of Idaho

Idaho Governor Butch Otter outlined his priorities during the 2018 Idaho Legislative Session during Monday’s State of the State address. He detailed both his budget proposal and the issues he wants to concentrate on during his last year in office.

Bruce Fingerhood / Flickr

Next week marks the start of the 2018 Idaho Legislature. While Governor Butch Otter will kick it off Monday with his final State of the State Address, the legislature will be looking at issues like education and children’s health care, with election year politics mixed in.

Bruce Newcomb

Taxes, legislator squabbles, herding cats and goat rodeos make up this week’s episode of “Legislative Breakdown.” In this week's podcast, Samantha Wright and Boise State Political Science Professor Gary Moncrief are joined by special guest former Idaho House Speaker Bruce Newcomb.

CECIL D. ANDRUS PAPERS, SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES, BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

Former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus died on Thursday, after years in political office and public service. He was a Democratic Governor in a state with a Republican legislature, but still managed to get things done.


Charlie Litchfield / AP

The Idaho Legislature closed up shop and went home Wednesday. The session went five days longer than leadership had anticipated.

The session was notable for a few bills, including transportation funding and tax cuts, which were sticking points at the end of the session. Lawmakers also didn’t find a solution for the 78,000 Idahoans who fall in the Medicaid gap and don’t have health insurance.

Otto Kitsinger / Associated Press

As we wrap up the 11th week of the 2017 Idaho Legislative Session, lawmakers have been struggling to finish up their work and go home. For several weeks, the goal has been to end the session Friday. House Speaker Scott Bedke said on Thursday lawmakers will have to come back on Monday.

This week lawmakers struggled with a large transportation funding bill. They tried and failed to pass a bill that would have helped some of the 78,000 people in Idaho who can’t afford health insurance. And tax cuts are still a sticking point.

Kevin Rank / Flickr

Bills were flying fast and furious in and out of the Idaho House and Senate this week, as lawmakers try to meet next Friday’s deadline to wrap up the session and go home.

As week ten of the legislature comes to a close, lawmakers still haven’t solved the Medicaid Gap in Idaho. Those are the people who can’t afford health care but make too much to qualify for Medicaid. Transportation funding and a tax cut are also still in the mix.

Boise State University political science professor Gary Moncrief says there are still around 100 bills to be considered in the House and Senate.

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