Google

HighSpeedInternet.com

As the year comes to a close, we wondered what people were thinking about the most during 2016. Turns out, so were the analysts at HighSpeedInternet.com. They’ve come out with a new map that shows what each state googled the most during the year.

For Idaho, the top googled item was … "Finding Dory." The movie apparently was a popular item in 2016 in the Gem State. Utah also found the term at the top of its list.

zippia.com

Idaho Googled “Bike Repair” more than any other state according to a map going around social media. It purports to show what job each state Googles more than any other. The map was created by career advice website Zippia.

screengrab blogs.estately.com

There’s a theory that postulates you can learn a lot about a person from what he/she searches for online (though I think people in the sciences would quibble over the use of the word theory there.) A blog from real estate site estately.com extends that theory to learning about states from residents’ Google searches. Estately’s 2015 list says Idaho Googled the word “Vaccines” more than any other state.

google.com/maps screen grab / Google

Google describes its new map feature with references to the movie “Back to the Future."

“Forget going 88 mph in a DeLorean—you can stay where you are and use Google Maps to virtually explore the world as it is—and as it was,” a company blog post declares. “Happy (time) traveling!”  

Patti Miller / Boise Airport

Imagine you step off a plane into an airport you've never been. You need a bathroom, a cup of coffee, and the gate for your connecting flight.  Which way do you turn?  Now if you’re in the Boise Airport, you can just turn on your smartphone, and follow the map. 

The Boise Airport is small, and easy to negotiate compared to say Los Angeles International. But spokeswoman Patti Miller says if you’ve never been here, you can get lost. 

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

As more people use Twitter and Facebook to stay in touch, more disaster response agencies are signing up for their own accounts.  The Bureau of Land Management, for instance, has been tweeting updates about the massive Kinyon Road fire burning this week in Southern Idaho.  Social media is playing a growing role in natural disasters.