Graduation

Mark Ramsay / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s 2016 college “go-on” numbers are up slightly, compared to a similar snapshot from 2015.

But even if the numbers are improving — and that’s still open to interpretation — they also show that Idaho has a long way to go to meet its ambitious college graduation goals.

George Prentice / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State graduates its class of 2017 on Saturday, May 6, marking the university’s 100th commencement. And for the first time, the ceremony will take place on the famous blue turf of Albertson’s Stadium.

Mark Ramsay / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s 2014-15 graduation rate again fell well below the national average — but the numbers showed some signs of improvement.

Idaho’s ranking moved up, slightly, and the state’s graduation rate is nudging closer to the national average.

Idaho’s 78.9 percent graduation rate ranked No. 39 nationally, according to figures released Monday by the U.S. Department of Education.

Raja Sambasivan / Flickr Creative Commons

The Idaho State Board of Education is considering linking funding for higher education to student success.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the board is drafting a proposal for next year's Legislature that would weight college's needs based on educational outcomes instead of growth in enrollment or credit hours taught.

Mark Ramsay / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s college graduation season and some of Idaho’s four-year state schools will soon hand out a record number of degrees.

Among Idaho’s four-year public colleges and universities, 7,209 students will graduate over the next two weeks. 

Idaho State University has the most grads this spring with 2,561 statewide. That’s up more than 100 from last year and a record for the school. Commencement is Saturday in Pocatello with a ceremony for the 253 grads of the Meridian campus Monday.

GadgetDude / Flickr Creative Commons

In 2012-13, Idaho’s high school graduation rate dropped to its lowest point in a decade.

The numbers — the most recent available — largely reflect a bookkeeping change. The federal government wants schools to do a better job of tracking students who leave the education system, even if they just transfer to another school; any students who fall through the cracks will be listed as dropouts.

Mark Ramsay / Flickr Creative Commons

New state data that tracks high school students after graduation show they're enrolling in more than 450 institutions in every state in the country.

The new system also shows that fewer than half of Idaho's graduates went on to post-secondary schools and universities after getting their diplomas.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Most Idaho schools are days away from summer vacation. Boise, Meridian and Kuna school districts will end the year this Friday.

May 31st is the most common last day this year. Nampa students finish a day earlier and Caldwell schools are already finished. 

Other districts like Blaine County and McCall-Donnelly continue classes through the first week of June. Twin Falls will go home halfway through next week.

Idaho’s high school graduation rate is better than all but nine states with 84 percent of students graduating on time. That’s according to a report out this week from the U.S. Department of Education. But the annual report has a multi-year lag.  This one looks at the 2009-2010 school year.

It also uses a method of counting grads and dropouts that even the authors consider antiquated. It compares the number of diplomas a state hands out with the number of students registered for 9th grade four years earlier.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The kind of finely tuned data crunching that fueled the 2012 election is spreading to another venue: the classroom. You might have heard that campaign analysts can predict who you're likely vote for based on the magazines you read and the car you drive. Now, researchers are finding ways to predict who's likely to drop out of high school based on, say, a third grade attendance record. Schools hope a computer program will help them reach kids before it's too late.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

We’ve been talking to Idaho students who have recently graduated from high school about what’s on their minds as they prepare for the next chapters in their lives.

Kassandra Ibarra got pregnant at 16. She dropped out of high school, but after her son was born she decided she needed an education to give him “the future he deserves.” When she got pregnant again she stayed in school and recently graduated from Boise’s Marian Pritchett School.

Tammie Ogden

As summer gets underway, this year's high school graduates are beginning the next chapters of their lives. Take Ian Woodruff, Laura Coleman, and Mallory Nelson. These three friends from Idaho City have lived in the mountain town of a few hundred people all their lives. All three head off to different colleges in the next few months. That brings excitement and trepidation. They worry about paying for school, making friends and finding jobs after they graduate from college.