Greenbelt

Anna Webb / Idaho Statesman

A monument commemorating the settlement of Boise by Europeans was set to be the focal point of a new small park along the Greenbelt. After taking a closer look at the inscription, the plan has been nixed and the monument retired.


Ada County Highway District

A new online map is giving Boise bicyclists a break during a time when many of their preferred pathways are closed.

Bikers have faced challenges since much of the Boise Greenbelt closed down due to the flooded Boise River. Though the water is receding, many parts of the 25-mile pathway were damaged by extensive flooding and remain closed.

Finding alternate routes around the handy bike path has been tough, but the Ada County Highway District has a new online map to help.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise River, which has been over flood stage for months, will drop below that level Thursday. The river has dropped dramatically this week.

The Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been dropping the amount of water released into the river all week. The river started dropping over the weekend, then fell 500 cubic feet per second on Tuesday and 1,000 cfs on Wednesday.

It will drop another 500 cfs Thursday morning. That will drop the river level at the Glenwood Bridge to 6,750 cfs, that brings it below flood stage which is 7,000 cfs.

Boise Police Department / Twitter

Much of the Greenbelt is closed and underwater, due to flooding on the Boise River. But eventually, the water will recede, leaving much of the 25 miles of pathway damaged or destroyed. But Boise has a plan once the river slows down.

In many places, the Greenbelt has been totally washed out by the river, which is well above flood stage. And City of Boise Spokesman Mike Journee says there’s more damage below the surface of the path.

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

As dam officials bump up the water flow on the Boise River yet again this week, it’s a good time to take a look at the numbers that matter during this flooding event.

This week, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to raise the water level at the Glenwood Bridge to 8,500 cubic feet per second. As of Wednesday, crews were pushing 9,240 cfs of water out of Lucky Peak Dam. Gina Baltrusch with the Walla Walla District of the Corps says about 1,000 cfs is being diverted into irrigation canals and the rest is flowing down the Boise.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise River will hit flood stage this week as officials try to make room in reservoirs for more rain and snowmelt.

The river will go up a little bit Monday, 250 cubic feet per second, and again Tuesday, which will bring flows to 7000 cfs. That’s considered flood stage as measured by the Glenwood Bridge gauge.

That means more sections of the Greenbelt along the river, some of which are already underwater, will be flooded. Minor flooding is expected on Eagle Island and other low spots along the river. And river bank erosion could become an issue.

Boise Parks and Recreation Department

If you’ve taken a stroll on the Boise Greenbelt in the last week or so, you’ve probably noticed a higher and faster river rushing past you. In just a few days, rocks in the river bed have been covered and large logs have been carried downstream.

Boise Parks and Recreation

Friday, Boise opened the last section of the Boise Greenbelt. It comes nearly fifty years after the city started gathering up land to create the iconic foot-and-bike-path.

The new .9-mile section is on the south side of the Boise River between Americana Boulevard and Garden City. With this section, Boise says the Greenbelt is complete within city limits. The footpath stretches nearly 26 miles along both sides of the river.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

A new, bright yellow marketing campaign is taking place on the Boise Greenbelt. Chalk stenciling with the phrase “Buck the Quo” is written on the path in places like Ann Morrison Park.  City officials say it's one of a limited number of nonprofit marketing campaigns approved by the city. 

Any Greenbelt advertising without the City of Boise's permission is illegal. Parks and Recreation Director Doug Holloway says it’s not often that he says yes to a marketing request.

Gordon Bowen Collection / Boise City Department of Arts and History

It’s 25 miles long and stretches from Eagle to Lucky Peak. The Greenbelt is Boise’s premiere biking and walking path. But how did dozens of separate chunks of riverside pathway eventually end up as one long greenbelt?

Using city documents, interviews with Greenbelt pioneers and historical research, Author David Proctor tells the story in his new book, “Pathway of Dreams: Building the Boise Greenbelt.”

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The little known Land and Water Conservation Fund turns 50 this year. The federal program has dispersed $17 billion over its lifetime. But now its future, and its mission of conserving open space in places like Idaho, is in limbo. Congress has let the fund lapse, and lawmakers are proposing some major changes.

Idaho Transportation Department

The Broadway Bridge is the preferred route for thousands of cars each day. But commuters will have to find a different route once the bridge closes down January 4.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Most of the people who use the Boise Greenbelt have a college degree. And last year, more people used it on weekdays. Those are two big conclusions from two years’ worth of surveys on the 45-year-old trail system.

Jaap Vos is director of the Community and Regional Planning Program at Boise State University. BSU has done surveys on the Greenbelt two years in 2012 and 2013.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

This Saturday, volunteers will wrap up a survey on the 25-mile-long Greenbelt in Boise. The survey will help Boise Parks and Recreation prioritize places that need improvements.

Earlier in the week, Rick Jakious took a few minutes out of his workout to answer the questions.

“How long did it take you to get from your home to the Greenbelt today?” asks a survey volunteer.

“Twenty minutes,” says Jakious.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise has made a lot of national top 10 lists lately, but one the city is conspicuously absent from is a list of best urban bike paths. The well-known Boise River Greenbelt does not appear on a list from TheActiveTimes.com, despite stretching from east Boise west toward Nampa.

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