Grizzly Bears

Jim Urquhart / AP Photo

Protections that have been in place for more than 40 years for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park area will be lifted this summer after U.S. government officials ruled Thursday that the population is no longer threatened.

Bryant Olsen / Flickr Creative Commons

Federal officials have approved an Idaho wildlife conservation plan to avoid potential listings under the Endangered Species Act.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service signed off on a state plan that identified 205 Idaho species of concern. Grizzlies, salmon and sage grouse were all on the list, as well as monarch butterflies. Wildlife officials are working on taking Yellowstone grizzlies off the Endangered Species List.

Jim Urquhart / AP Photo

Federal officials are delaying their decision on whether to lift protections for more than 700 grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park and allow hunting, amid opposition from dozens of American Indian tribes and conservation groups.

Officials had planned to finalize the proposal to turn jurisdiction on grizzlies over to state officials in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming by the end of 2016.

Charles Peterson / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Fish and Game officials are in Lewiston today discussing the biggest wildlife issues in the state.

The seven-person fish and game commission has a lot on their agenda, including the review of public input on a proposal for the state to take over management of Yellowstone grizzlies.

Jason Bechtel / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed lifting endangered species status for grizzly bears around Yellowstone National Park. But before that happens, Idaho, Wyoming and Montana each need to come up with plans for how they would manage the population – including rules for hunting the predators.

A public meeting will be held this week in Boise on the potential for a grizzly bear hunting season in Idaho.

Dan Dzurisin / Flickr Creative Commons

A battered and blood-streaked survivor of a bear attack says in a video he shot on his way to the hospital that "Life sucks in bear country."

Todd Orr posted video, photos and a narrative about Saturday's attack in southwestern Montana on his Facebook page. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesman Ron Aasheim confirmed Monday that Orr was attacked.

Orr says a grizzly sow with two cubs charged him and bit his arms and shoulders as he protected his neck.

Mick Thompson / Flickr Creative Commons

The reward for information leading to the person or persons who illegally killed a federally protected grizzly bear in eastern Idaho is up to $15,600.

The Center for Biological Diversity on Thursday announced it's contributing $5,000.

The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust also on Thursday announced they're offering $5,000.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has already offered $5,000 to the reward that includes $600 from the Citizens Against Poaching.

Bryant Olsen / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Customs and Border Protection wants to reopen a northern Idaho road in designated grizzly bear habitat near the Canadian border the federal agency says is needed for national security.

A 6-mile section of Bog Creek Road in the Idaho Panhandle National Forests would be opened for official use to provide an east-west route in the Selkirk Mountains.

The road cuts through the Selkirk Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone and was closed in the 1980s to protect grizzlies. Officials say it has deteriorated and needs significant repairs.

screengrab / National Geographic Channel

Mud baths aren't just for spa-loving humans.

A National Geographic video captured both grizzlies and black bears submerging in what's referred to as a "bear bathtub" in Yellowstone National Park. The natural swimming hole serves as a place for the bears to cool off, take a drink and get squeaky clean.

Cameras placed around the hole recorded the action, giving insight into the iconic predators' behavior.

Charles Peterson / Flickr Creative Commons

Federal wildlife officials plan to take the grizzly bear off the Endangered Species List in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. If the proposal goes through, Idaho will take over management of the bear within the state’s borders. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe says the decision to take the iconic predator off the list comes after decades of collaboration. 

Wildlife Conservation Society

The future of grizzly bears could change this year, if the animals who frequent Yellowstone National Park are taken off the Endangered Species List. As more animals move outside the park, groups like the Wildlife Conservation Society, or WCS, are looking at where the bears go.

A new study looks at how black and grizzly bears are expanding into habitat in Idaho outside of Yellowstone National Park and how they may interact with humans.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

A nearly toothless, 25-year-old male grizzly bear that repeatedly broke into buildings in eastern Idaho has been euthanized.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a statement Thursday says the grizzly was killed Monday near Island Park because it had become habituated to human-related foods.

Regional Wildlife Manager Curtis Hendricks says the bear made no direct threat to humans but its advanced age and decreasing ability to forage naturally increased the potential for conflict.

Nabil Omar / Flickr Creative Commons

A woman who killed a grizzly bear after she believed it posed a threat to her North Idaho family is worried she may be in trouble for killing a federally protected species.

The Spokesman-Review reports Barbara Casey shot the 2-year-old male grizzly Tuesday after it appeared in the backyard of her Moyie Springs home in Boundary County.

Grizzly, wildlife, grizzlies, endangered species list
Jason Bechtel / Flickr Creative Commons

Twenty-four grizzly bears have been captured so far this year in and around Yellowstone National Park as wildlife managers start another season of research toward a potential lifting of federal protections.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team captured the grizzlies in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and outside the parks in Montana and Wyoming.

Teams are now starting to trap grizzlies in eastern Idaho.

The estimated grizzly population in the 19,000-square-mile Yellowstone ecosystem is 757 bears.

Bryant Olsen / Flickr Creative Commons

About 750 acres in northern Idaho that's habitat for grizzly bears and other wildlife has been preserved through a federal grant purchase.

The Spokesman-Review reports that a family last month sold the development rights to the land along the Kootenai River north of Bonners Ferry for $798,000.

The grant money through the federal Forest Legacy Program is intended to protect habitat for wildlife while also providing recreation for visitors and allowing logging to continue.

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