Halloween

Paul Moody / Flickr

The solar eclipse that crossed America from coast to coast was a once in a lifetime experience. All over Idaho, cities in the path of totality held events to celebrate the occasion. While crowds weren’t as big as expected, one event in Cascade failed to launch. The man behind that venture is back attempting another festival.

Rodger / Flickr

Fall is here, and with the cool, long nights and crisp days, thoughts are turning to the holidays. Leading the charge of fall occasions is Halloween. It’s the time for cobwebs, costumes and of course, candy.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

A Halloween activity growing in popularity is that of cemetery tours. These guided tours are designed not only to provide a little scare, but usually include a lot of history about the cemetery and the people buried there.

Preservation Idaho, which works to preserve historic sites in the state, is hosting a tour Sunday of Boise's Cloverdale Cemetery. It’s known for its resident swans and a group of reindeer which live on the premises.

Nat Tung / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s almost that time of year, where you give out handfuls of candy to young trick or treaters. But what kind of candy is the most popular?

Turns out, Idaho’s number one Halloween candy is … candy corn. Apparently it’s a big hit according to CandyStore.com.

Yes, there is a place on the internet where you can buy pounds of candy for Halloween, or any other occasion. CandyStore.com has been around since 2007.

Phil Sedgwick / Courtesy Concordia School of Law

Warning: This is the most "Public Radio" Halloween story possible.

Andrew Kim, a professor at Concordia University School of Law in Boise wrote a paper that will be published in an upcoming edition of the Savannah Law Review. What does that have to do with Halloween? Well, the paper is about law on the TV show The Walking Dead.

The Walking Dead is about survivors of a zombie apocalypse who battle the undead as well as fight other people over scarce resources. It’s both popular and gruesome but Kim thinks it reveals a lot about the rule of law versus the rule of nature.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Some neighborhoods see a lot more trick-or-treaters than others Halloween night. One of the busiest Halloween hotspots is Boise’s Harrison Boulevard.

We caught up with Harrison homeowner Scott Petersen as he was painting the walkway to his front door with a rectangular sponge attached to a handle.

“At the moment we’re actually creating our yellow brick road," Petersen says. "I found this little tool at Home Depot and my girlfriend found the paint, which is washable, which is critical.”