Health Insurance

C-SPAN

Governor Butch Otter was the featured guest on C-SPAN’s program "Washington Journal" Monday morning. The network’s bus rolled into Idaho on a national tour of state capitals.

Idaho Capitol Dome
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho House lawmakers have once again refused to consider a bill that would extend health insurance to low-income residents.

AP

An Idaho health care proposal to provide insurance to the needy that was deemed dead for the year by legislative leaders has been given a second chance at life.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

The federal government weighed in on Idaho’s attempt to skirt provisions in the Affordable Care Act. On Thursday, the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services sent a letter to state leaders warning them they were on thin ice with the proposed policies.

Otto Kitsinger / AP Photo

Idaho's move to let companies offer health insurance plans that don't meet Affordable Care Act standards is illegal, U.S. officials said Thursday.

U.S. Pacific Fleet / Flickr

Governor Butch Otter met with federal health officials over the weekend regarding the future of Idaho’s controversial insurance plans.

AP Photo

During a wide-reaching press conference Thursday, Governor Butch Otter (R) defended the involvement of Lieutenant Governor Brad Little (R) in allowing insurance companies to offer plans that don’t comply with federal law.

Amy / Flickr

Insurer Blue Cross of Idaho submitted plans this week to state regulators that open the door for policies that don’t comply with the Affordable Care Act – something pushed by Governor Butch Otter.

Alex Proimos / Flickr

The state of Idaho is attempting to lower insurance premiums by proposing policies that scrap key provisions established in the Affordable Care Act. Called legally dubious by some opponents, the state’s attempt at closing the so-called insurance gap in the Gem State by disregarding Obamacare mandates is thought to be the first of its kind in the nation.

Blue Cross of Idaho

Health insurance officials are warning lawmakers that switching public employees to a self-insurance model could place the state at a greater financial risk.

Funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, better known as CHIP, expired last week. The federal program covers some 35,000 Idaho children whose families don't qualify for Medicaid and cannot afford insurance.

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

A new state analysis on switching public employees to a self-insurance model casts doubt on the estimated savings that have become a key talking point in Idaho's open gubernatorial race.

According to Mercer — the state's newest actuarial consultant — Idaho taxpayers could save roughly $13 million during the first year of implementing a self-insurance model.

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The latest attempt by Republican senators to repeal the Affordable Care Act is still looking for the 51 votes necessary to pass it this month. Known as the Graham-Cassidy bill, the policy would repeal Medicaid expansion for low-income folks and revoke the premium tax credits that are mainstays of Obamacare.


Health insurance premiums in Idaho will go up in 2018, between 6 and 81 percent depending on the plan you choose.  That's according to proposed increases to the price of your health care plan.

Each year, insurance companies operating in Idaho send their planned price hikes to the Department of Insurance. The proposed increases were released Monday for 2018.

The proposed average overall statewide rate increase is 38 percent. The average price for Bronze, Silver, and Gold plans are all going up, with Silver plans averaging a 50 percent increase.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

After being constructed in secret by a small group of Republican senators, a push is underway to pass a bill reforming the nation's health care system.

For perspective on what changes could be in store both nationally and in Idaho, Matt Guilhem spoke to Dr. David Pate, the President and CEO of St. Luke's Health System.

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