Heat Wave

Pockafwye / Flickr

Sunday broke some records for high temperatures, but the heat didn’t break Idaho Power’s record for peak demand. That’s even though the company is seeing tremendous demand on the system.

Sunday, the company used 3,292 megawatts of power to keep irrigators pumping and air conditioners on. But spokeswoman Lynette Standley says the system record — set July 2 — 2013, is 3,407 megawatts.

Idaho Power expects to use more power Monday than Sunday. Standley says the projection is over 3,300 megawatts. That compares to an average use of less than 2,000 megawatts.

Kerry Lannert / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Power sees the highest demand for electricity in the summer when people crank up their air conditioners. And with a long stretch of very hot weather in store, that demand is expected to be very high.

The utility that powers most of southwest Idaho and eastern Oregon set a new record for energy consumption just two years ago in July. Idaho Power spokesman Brad Bowlin says that record could be surpassed soon.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

UPDATED: The National Weather Service reports Boise hit 110 degrees shortly after 4:00 p.m. Monday.  Since record keeping began, the highest temperature ever recorded in Boise is 111. Monday's high broke the previous record by a whopping six degrees.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Sunday saw record high temperatures for much of southwest Idaho and eastern Oregon. In Boise it got to 91 degrees. That unusual heat brings a chance of thunderstorms for much of this week. But the temperature won’t stay at record levels long. Later in the week highs will likely drop to the 50s. 

Jay Briendenbach, the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at NOAA's National Weather Service Office in Boise, says a system of high pressure ridges and troughs is circulating hot and cold air around the country quickly.