High School

Michael Lycklama / Idaho Statesman

Officials in southwestern Idaho say a high school football field that had construction delays will be ready for Friday's home opener.

The West Ada School District tells the Idaho Statesman that the $600,000 field at Eagle High School will be ready for the team's game against defending state champion Mountain View.

A company called Sprinturf delayed installing artificial turf amid concerns the gravel base supporting the field was too soft.

Whittier School Students Kids Buses
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

The results of an annual survey, released this week, show the majority of Treasure Valley high school students plan to go onto college, but not all of them achieve that goal. 

David Erickson / Flickr Creative Commons

An Idaho school district will hand out nearly 2,000 laptops as the first phase of a personalized learning initiative.

KTVB-TV reports the Nampa School District will issue the Dell Latitude laptops to Columbia High School students this week. The computers can be used at school and at home.

The laptops are part of a three-year, $3.5 million project to modernize classroom technology and curriculum. It will also feature professional development for teachers.

Adam Cotterell

In the role of defense attorney, Leah March begins to interrogate her witness. It starts off establishing the basic facts. He says he’s a 42-year-old ranch hand. He lives in Picabo, Idaho. Yes, he knows the plaintiff. He’s actually a high school junior named Eric Wilford and the Basque accent he’s using isn’t real.

More questions than answers hang around Idaho lawmakers grappling over the now defunct statewide school broadband access program.

A legislative interim committee met Tuesday to begin determining whether the Idaho Legislature should attempt a new statewide broadband program.

Idaho's broadband program dissolved earlier this year after a district judge ruled the $60 million contract that created the system was illegal. This left individual school districts scrambling to secure their own broadband access contracts for the upcoming school year.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho high school senior made waves earlier this month for a pointed editorial taking aim at Superintendent of Public Instruction-elect Sherri Ybarra.

Harmony Soto, 17, decided to plagiarize Boise Weekly writer George Prentice after Ybarra narrowly won November's election -- even after Ybarra was accused of plagiarizing her opponent's campaign website.

Today’s teenagers will soon inherit all of the worlds’ big problems. So why not enlist their help in solving them? That’s the idea behind the 24 Hour Think Challenge sponsored by the J.A. And Kathryn Albertson Foundation and the student leadership organization One Stone.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

It’s easy to hear the pride in Randy Jewett’s voice when he talks about his school’s football heritage. He stands in Camas County High School in Fairfield, and points to class pictures that line the main hallway. He says in the 1970s, the Mushers were regulars in the state championship. 

Some Idaho lawmakers are upset by State Schools Superintendent Tom Luna's announcement that a $2.1 million annual statewide Wi-Fi network contract will run for up to 15 years — without prior legislative budget approval.

Luna's office said Wednesday Education Networks of America won the contract to equip as many as 340 Idaho high schools with the wireless Internet technology. Nine companies submitted bids. ENA's came in under the $2.25 million set aside by the 2013 Legislature for next year.

The media team of Newsweek and the Daily Beast has released its annual list of the nation’s best high schools. Seven Idaho schools made this year’s top 2,000 list. Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy is ranked 89, the only Idaho school to crack the top 100.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

We’ve been talking to Idaho students who have recently graduated from high school about what’s on their minds as they prepare for the next chapters in their lives.

Kassandra Ibarra got pregnant at 16. She dropped out of high school, but after her son was born she decided she needed an education to give him “the future he deserves.” When she got pregnant again she stayed in school and recently graduated from Boise’s Marian Pritchett School.

Tammie Ogden

As summer gets underway, this year's high school graduates are beginning the next chapters of their lives. Take Ian Woodruff, Laura Coleman, and Mallory Nelson. These three friends from Idaho City have lived in the mountain town of a few hundred people all their lives. All three head off to different colleges in the next few months. That brings excitement and trepidation. They worry about paying for school, making friends and finding jobs after they graduate from college.