Higher Education

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

The heads of every public college and university in Idaho have sent a letter to the state’s legislative delegation in Washington D.C. The educators are united in their opposition to the tax bill being hashed out by congressional Republicans.

Each fall, more than 2,500 Idaho freshmen begin their college careers by taking remedial classes.

SAT Logo

The SAT scores for Idaho students have come in, and they’re about average. But that depends on which states you're comparing them with.

Idaho’s average SAT score, for the 2017 graduating class, was 1006 out of a 1600 point scale.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

The Idaho State Board of Education has announced that more than 20,000 high school students have been admitted to Idaho's public colleges and universities.

According to the board, this is the third year students with qualifying grades and test scores have automatically been admitted to Boise State University, University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Lewiston-Clark State College or one of the state's four community colleges.

Mark Ramsay / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho’s 2016 college “go-on” numbers are up slightly, compared to a similar snapshot from 2015.

But even if the numbers are improving — and that’s still open to interpretation — they also show that Idaho has a long way to go to meet its ambitious college graduation goals.

Idaho Ed News

Idaho’s higher education task force could set a number of ambitious goals — including a marked improvement in SAT scores.

One of the task force’s work groups wants to see 60 percent of Idaho’s high school juniors meet the SAT’s college- and career-readiness benchmarks by 2022-23.

That’s a big lift. In April, only 32 percent of Idaho high school juniors met the SAT benchmarks.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has created a Task Force on Higher Education that he hopes will increase the amount of workers who have post-high school education.

The Idaho Statesman reported Sunday that the task force is a reaction to short progress made toward the state's goal to ensure 60 percent of its workforce between the ages of 25 to 34 have post-high school education by 2020. The rate has risen from 38 to 42 percent since the goal was established.

AP Photo

Speaking at an Associated Press legislative preview Friday, Idaho Governor Butch Otter hinted at some of his priorities for the 2017 session.

Otter traditionally unveils his budget and policy plans in his State of the State speech, which he gives on the first day of the session, which is Monday. But he did give a sneak peek Friday morning when he said his main focus will be education.

He’ll ask lawmakers for $58 million for the teacher pay raise program known as the Career Ladder. The five-year plan is in its third year and Otter says the goals are straightforward.

Northwest Nazarene University

Northwest Nazarene University (NNU) in Nampa welcomes its thirteenth president Thursday. The university is holding an inauguration of Joel Pearsall, who follows in his father’s footsteps. Pearsall's father was president of the Christian college from 1973 to 1983.

According to a press release, the new leader received his undergraduate degree from the school in 1980, and then went on to law school in Oregon.

Boise State University, campus
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Treasure Valley students and residents this fall will have an opportunity to take classes from Harvard Business School without leaving Idaho. Boise State University and the famed Ivy League school announced a new partnership Thursday.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State University and Concordia Law School have created an arrangement aimed at undergrads who want to go to law school. Students can start at Concordia after three years at Boise State. For students in the “three plus three” program, the first year at Concordia will also count as the fourth year at Boise State. So students could get a bachelor's and a law degree in six years, rather than seven.

Concordia Law dean Cathy Silak says the program will help students minimize debt and get to the workforce quicker. She says it was a natural partnership.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Two Idaho Universities have exemptions from a federal law that bans discrimination against transgender students.

Raja Sambasivan / Flickr Creative Commons

The Idaho State Board of Education is considering linking funding for higher education to student success.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the board is drafting a proposal for next year's Legislature that would weight college's needs based on educational outcomes instead of growth in enrollment or credit hours taught.

Courtesy Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Since we learned recently that a for-profit medical school will be built in Meridian, we’ve also heard criticism that it won't help solve Idaho’s doctor shortage. Much of that criticism is about the lack of residency positions in Idaho. Critics argue doctors don’t practice where they go to medical school, but where they do their residency. Idaho only has 41 spots for residents and competition is already stiff.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Partnerships between public universities and private companies – called technology transfers – have the potential to solve some of the world's most difficult problems. The idea is to have researchers at universities do their work, and then the institution will help them obtain a patent. At that point, the product can be sold to a private company for distribution. Think of the iconic Gatorade story at the University of Florida. 

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