Homeless

homeless, sign
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The city of Boise and a group of partner agencies broke ground Wednesday on a new housing development designed to help the chronically homeless in the community.


Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Officials in Idaho's capitol city say they're happy with a program offering homeless residents employment with the Boise Parks and Recreation Department.

The program is a partnership between the city and Interfaith Sanctuary, a homeless shelter, modeled after a similar initiative in Albuquerque, New Mexico, The Idaho Statesman reported recently.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The alley known as Cooper Court wraps around Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter near downtown Boise. For much of 2015 the alley was packed to bursting with tents, makeshift shelters and the people living in them who preferred the streets to staying in shelters. That camp was one of the biggest local news stories of 2015. Police eventually cleared it, scattering its residents.

Interfaith Sanctuary

Homeless people in Boise face many challenges, including where to sleep, where to find food and how to get around. But one homeless advocate found that one of the biggest challenges of being homeless is proving who you are. Getting a legal, photo ID, if you don’t have one, can be almost impossible.

Interfaith Sanctuary

Boise’s Interfaith Sanctuary is holding a musical benefit Thursday night at the Record Exchange. Its directors say they’ve changed how they look at homelessness and now rely more than ever on the generosity of the community.

Interfaith Co-Director Jodi Peterson says in the past, the Sanctuary had two licensed social workers to serve 164 guests at night at the shelter. But Peterson says that wasn’t enough. So they upped the budget from $650,000 to one million dollars, and now employ 10 case managers.

A Boise man who was once a plaintiff in a high-profile anti-panhandling lawsuit has registered as a Republican candidate for Idaho governor.

Troy Minton joins an increasingly crowded race. With Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter saying he will not seek a fourth term in 2018, the race already has three competitive GOP candidates: Lt. Gov. Brad Little, former state Sen. Russ Fulcher and Boise businessman Tommy Alhquist.

No candidate has yet to file as a Democrat for governor.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho is picking up close to $4 million in federal money to prevent and end homelessness.

Tuesday the Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded the state $3.6 million to fund 32 local projects aimed at helping the homeless.

Programs from all corners of the state will receive awards. CATCH of Ada County Rapid Re-housing will pick up $89,000. Idaho Falls Permanent Housing will get $86,000. And Magic Valley Rapid Re-housing will get $44,000.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The Lewiston City Council has approved a 182-day moratorium on new or expanded homeless shelters in the city.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that on Monday the council voted in favor of the moratorium, which officials say will give the council time to enact new zoning codes and standards for the organizations.

Belonging is a fundamental human need. Equally strong is the drive to exclude. This is what Seattle University School of Law professor Sara Rankin calls "the influence of exile," which transcends individuals when powerful groups use laws and policies to restrict marginalized groups. The impulse to exclude is visible today in laws that criminalize and eject visibly poor people, including the homeless, from public spaces.

facebook.com/boiserescuemission

The Boise Rescue Mission is experiencing a financial crisis. The Christian organization’s leaders say it’s not because of lack of generosity from the community.

 The Rescue Mission has two homeless shelters in Boise and two in Nampa. Holiday contributions are important for keeping those shelters open. And direct mailing is the key to bringing that money in. So when a piece of holiday mail just didn’t get sent last year, CEO Bill Roscoe says the mission was hit hard.

Justin Doering / Fifty Sandwiches blog

Recent Boise State University media studies graduate Justin Doering has set out on a unique cross-country journey.

Through a blog he's calling "Fifty Sandwiches," Doering has set out to interview people experiencing homelessness. The blogger says the idea is to "close the gap between perception and reality" when it comes to what homeless individuals experience.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The City of Boise and a handful of nonprofit and public sector partners Tuesday announced a new program to house the area’s chronically homeless population. The plan would first put 15 homeless people in existing apartments for a cost of about $300,000 a year. Those would be owned by the city, the county housing authority and private landlords. KBSX previewed this plan in October

Ryan Zehm / NurFace Games

It’s a rags to riches story, starring a Boise man who lost it all, then found his way back through video games. Now Ryan Zehm owns and operates a thriving gaming company called NurFace Games.

A few years ago, Zehm went from working at a top tech company to living at a Boise homeless shelter. Now, he’s telling his story of how his perseverance and a little help from the Boise Public Library brought him back from the brink.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

In the months leading up to the eviction of more than 100 people from a tent city near downtown, Boise city leaders frequently cited crime as one of the main reasons the camp needed to be cleared.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Update 1:55 p.m. Wednesday: A plan to relocate some of the homeless people ejected from a Boise tent city last week has fallen through after objections from potential neighbors.

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