Idaho

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise Depot is one of those places Boiseans take visitors to show off their town. The early 20th Century Spanish architecture stands out and is a great backdrop for weddings and parties.

But the one thing you haven’t found at the depot for 20 years? Passenger trains.

Colin Falconer has long wondered why that is. Falconer is originally from Seattle and used to take the Amtrak to northern Idaho to swim in lakes with friends when he was a kid. He loved being able to watch the scenery go by, and goof around in the aisles with his buddies.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Apparently, Vogue is really into Idaho these days.

The formidable magazine published an online article titled “Why Boise, Idaho, Is a Growing Culinary Hotspot.” The piece, written by Jen Murphy, gives an overview of some of the well-loved local spots in the Capital City. Among them: Guru Donuts, the Basque Marketplace, Red Feather Lounge and State & Lemp.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

A new report says nearly 600,000 homes in Idaho are at some risk of wildfire. The data released Wednesday by real estate data firm CoreLogic shows Idaho ranks 11th in the number of at-risk homes out of the 13 Western states examined.

Nat Tung / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s almost that time of year, where you give out handfuls of candy to young trick or treaters. But what kind of candy is the most popular?

Turns out, Idaho’s number one Halloween candy is … candy corn. Apparently it’s a big hit according to CandyStore.com.

Yes, there is a place on the internet where you can buy pounds of candy for Halloween, or any other occasion. CandyStore.com has been around since 2007.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

It’s a hot August afternoon and Maria sits in a car in a Kuna parking lot. The air is on a little but the engine’s not running so it doesn’t do much good. Despite the heat Maria wears a pink sweatshirt and a matching baseball cap. Maybe this heat doesn’t seem so bad to her because she just finished several hours working in a corn field.

“Today we were dis-tasseling the corn, taking all the tassels off,” she says. “They say it helps it grow faster.”

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idahoans can carry a concealed gun without needing licenses or training starting Friday.

The change is just one of the new laws going into effect with the start of the new fiscal year in Idaho. This means the state will implement a new budget and plenty of new policies.

Other new laws include banning powdered alcohol, but finally allowing movie theaters to serve booze during movies that show nudity.

As the price of mustard rises, growers in Idaho have expanded the average devoted to the crop by 250 percent.

The Capital Press reports that at 33.1 cents per pound delivered, mustard prices are up about 2.5 per pound from last year, making it one of the few crops to have increased in value in 2016. Idaho growers have seized on the opportunity to turn a profit.

Jeremiah Clark

Farmers in Peru and Bolivia have been growing and eating quinoa for a long, long time. But over the last decade, the grain’s high nutritional value has made it a popular food in countries like the U.S. and Canada. South America quinoa production has more than doubled since 2010 as producers have tried to meet international demand.

National Life Group

Wallace, Idaho was once one of the largest and most prosperous towns in the state. Situated beside Interstate 90 west of Coeur d'Alene and less than 100 miles from the Canadian border, the old mining town boomed around the turn of the 20th century. At its height, Wallace miners produced the most silver in the country, earning it the nickname "Silver Capital of the World."

WBEZ / Flickr Creative Commons

There’s a story you hear in small towns and big cities all over the country. It goes like this: a lot of people get addicted to prescription opioid pain killers like oxycodone. When they can’t get those anymore they turn to heroin because the experience is similar and heroin is cheaper and easier to get. Much of the United States is now experiencing what is widely being called a heroin epidemic.

In Idaho we have the first part of that story. Walter Bogucki is an inpatient counselor at Port of Hope, a drug treatment center in Nampa.

Dept. of Defense

The latest episode of Serial, the This American Life podcast covering Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in its second season, explored the reasons the Idaho soldier said he walked off base in 2009.

Bergdahl told filmmaker Mark Boal that he wrote upwards of 380 pages for a report for Maj. Kenneth Dahl, who investigated the case, about his motivations for leaving his base in Afghanistan. 

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In the fifth episode of 'Serial," the popular podcast focusing its second season on Idaho native Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, producer Sarah Koenig explores the many ways, official and unofficial, people stateside sought Bergdahl's freedom.

Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban in 2009 when he walked off his base in Afghanistan. He was held for about five years until President Barack Obama negotiated a deal to have him released.

Dept. of Defense

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a U.S. soldier who walked off his base in Afghanistan in 2006, didn't like clocks in his room after being rescued from the Taliban in 2014, he said in the fourth episode of "Serial's" second season.

"Serial" is the popular "This American Life" spin-off podcast that delved into a true crime story in its first season and is focusing on Bergdahl in its second season.

Bergdahl told filmmaker Mark Boal in an interview on the episode that he became uncomfortable with clocks during his five years in the Taliban's hands.

"Months and days, weeks or months, don't matter because (the) only thing you can really understand is how long the seconds are lasting," Bergdahl said in the interview. "That's what hits you the hardest: is just the seconds."

Click here to read the entire story from the Idaho Statesman.

Idaho Statesman

It’s quickly established where “Serial,” the popular podcast focusing its second season on the story of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, got the name of its second episode, “The Golden Chicken.”

That’s a name a member of the Taliban used to describe Bergdahl as a prized capture. Mujahid Rahman, whom producer Sarah Koenig identified as one of the Taliban who helped hide Bergdahl in the days following his 2009 capture, claimed they designated Bergdahl a guest to keep lower Taliban members from killing or abusing Bergdahl.

Jerry Mathes

A writer from Idaho has won a North American Book Award. Author Jerry Mathes won the best memoir award for his book “Ahead of the Flaming Front: A Life on Fire.”

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