Idaho News

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Castle Rock sticks out of the foothills in northeast Boise. Native Americans called it Eagle Rock and the land below it was considered sacred. But the U.S. Army rounded up the area’s Indians and sent them to reservations to make way for white settlers in the late 1800s. The descendants of those people are gathering Friday in Boise’s Quarry View Park, which is on part of that land below Castle Rock.

Caro / Flickr Creative Commons

Members of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe have started a 100-plus-mile journey in hand-carved canoes to call attention to the tribe's interest in restoring salmon to the Columbia River above Grand Coulee Dam.

The dam has blocked fish passage in the river since the 1930s.

Chris vT / Flickr Creative Commons

Update, Friday - 12:09 p.m.: The Humane Society of the United States, the largest animal welfare organization in the nation, is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for lethally poisoning Casey Echevarria's 12 dogs.

Grab app

There's been a lot of news lately about long lines at airports. The head of daily operations at the Transportation Security Administration was removed from office earlier this week, as frustrations mount at the country's bigger airports.

The national YMCA has put its Twin Falls chapter on probation after finding widespread financial mismanagement at that branch.

The Times-News reports that a February assessment conducted by the national YMCA says the nonprofit organization's local board asked for help when it realized then-CEO Gary Ettenger was providing false financial information.

Ettenger stepped down in March. He could not be reached for comment.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

An Idaho Falls man is suing Idaho State University, claiming that he was discriminated against because of his Mormon faith.

The Post Register reports that Orin Duffin filed the lawsuit Friday. He says he was severely harassed while playing for the men's tennis team because of his membership in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

ISU spokesman Stuart Summers says school officials won't comment on the pending litigation.

IcaWise / Flickr Creative Commons

If you lived in a rural part of the state in 1990, there’s a good chance that you now live in a town or city. That’s according to census data parsed by the Idaho Department of Labor. Researcher Janell Hyer says people are continuing to move where the jobs are – and that means more populated cities like Boise and Meridian.

“People are coming from the rural areas moving into the urban areas," says Hyer. "Even though they may not be growing as fast as they were in previous years, they are still growing and that’s where the growth is taking place.”

Extreme Medicine / Flickr Creative Commons

A group that helps wounded veterans climb mountains says a 30-year-old Boise native has become the first combat wounded veteran to summit Mount Everest.

The Heroes Project announced Thursday that retired U.S. Marine Corp Staff Sgt. Charlie Linville reached the 29,029-foot summit at 10:22 a.m. Mountain Time.

The group says it was the third attempt to reach the summit by the Boise High School graduate after previous tries in 2014 and 2015.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr Creative Commons

Officials in the central Idaho resort town of Ketchum are moving ahead with possibly installing three or four welcome signs.

The Ketchum City Council on Monday directed City Parks and Recreation Director Jen Smith to work with the Ketchum Arts Commission on potential designs.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the council also wants to look into starting a fundraising campaign and a process for selecting an artist.

Councilman Baird Gourlay says he wants a sign where visitors can pull over and take photos.

Craig Bennett / Flickr

The U.S. Postal Service is using new technology to try to keep the number of dog bites down on postal routes.

Two new safety measures will help alert postal carriers about dogs. Dan Corral is the Postmaster of Boise. He says when customers sign up to use USPS.com’s package pickup application, they’ll be asked if they have a dog. And starting later this month, the Post Office will use special package scanners to warn of problem dogs at specific residences.

Dept. of Defense

A military judge is delaying the start of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's military trial until February.

Col. Jeffrey Nance said during a pre-trial hearing Tuesday at Fort Bragg in North Carolina that delaying the court-martial from August should allow enough time to sort through access to classified documents by Bergdahl's defense team.

Nance also ordered military prosecutors to set up online access to court documents for news organizations covering the case of the soldier charged with desertion for leaving his combat outpost in Afghanistan and falling into Taliban hands.

Architect of the Capitol

In the 2.3 million acres that make up the Payette National Forest, there is a single tree with a major holiday destiny to fulfill. 

The Christmas tree that adorns the Capitol lawn in Washington, D.C., this year will come from Idaho. Now that the snow is melting up high, the hunt for the perfect tree is on.

Finding the Capitol Christmas tree is a lot like what most families do each year, just on a much bigger scale.  

The Chronicle Magazine / Flickr Creative Commons

Southwest Idaho authorities have issued a warning after reporting that a man consumed marijuana laced with a chemical and suffered irreversible damage.

Chief Deputy Mike Barclay of the Elmore County Sheriff's Office says emergency responders on Sunday went to an address in Glenns Ferry where a man had a severe medical problem.

Detectives tell KIVI-TV that the man consumed marijuana containing some type of additive and authorities are concerned more might be in the area.

Jimmy Emerson / Flickr Creative Commons

Almost ten percent of Idaho State University’s population is made up of students from Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. But recent and continued reports of violence against the Middle Eastern community in Pocatello are causing some to question how long these students will attend the school.

Idaho Statesman

A group of Boise homeowners are planning a lawsuit over shifting ground that has moved their homes over the past few weeks.

KTVB-TV reports that two homeowners in Boise foothills neighborhood have already filed tort claims against the city and the Ada County Highway District, and others say they plan to file lawsuits against the developer and engineers of the Terra Nativa subdivision.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and Archives

If you haven’t heard of FDR’s hour-and-a-half stop in Boise on September 27, 1937, you probably aren’t alone. It was the first and only time he visited the city.

 

Almost 80 years later, there’s a local effort to have the visit formally commemorated. 

The president and his wife arrived by train that morning after a stop in Pocatello the night before and would go on from Boise to dedicate the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. But before they did, they got in an open-roof motorcade and cruised the streets of Boise. 

Deschutes County Jail

A self-styled journalist who traveled to Oregon in early January to spread the message of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers is facing federal weapons charges in Grant County.

But a man associated with a recovered machine gun says he was surprised to see the weapon turn up in a federal investigation, noting that federal agents hadn’t contacted him before or after the arrest.

Travis / Flickr Creative Commons

Southwest Idaho officials approved the building of a private airstrip in the foothills north of Boise in a decision that will become final if not appealed within 15 days.

The Ada County Planning and Zoning Commission at a Thursday meeting gave Dean Hilde the OK to build the 1,200-foot landing strip on about 150 acres as well as a 3,600-square-foot hangar and shop.

If an appeal is filed, it will be heard by the Board of Ada County Commissioners, followed by another public hearing giving Hilde and the public a chance to speak. The decision by the board would be final.

Courtesy of the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

One of the defendants in the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon earlier this year has apologized for video rants he made that were widely seen during the standoff.

Sean Anderson, 47, told a federal judge Wednesday he was "embarrassed" and "ashamed" by the videos from the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. In one Anderson told supporters if police stopped them on their way to the refuge they should "kill them."

National Life Group

Wallace, Idaho was once one of the largest and most prosperous towns in the state. Situated beside Interstate 90 west of Coeur d'Alene and less than 100 miles from the Canadian border, the old mining town boomed around the turn of the 20th century. At its height, Wallace miners produced the most silver in the country, earning it the nickname "Silver Capital of the World."

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