Idaho Public Television

The Spokesman Review

This story originally aired on Februray 13, 2017.

It’s been 25 years since the Ruby Ridge siege in North Idaho. Randy Weaver and his family faced off with federal agents in a shocking stand-off on a mountain top not far from Bonners Ferry.

The siege began on August 21, 1992 and lasted 11 days. In the end, Weaver and a friend were shot and injured, and three people were dead, including Weaver’s wife and young son and a federal agent. Moreover, the incident became a rallying cry for those who felt law enforcement had overstepped its bounds.

PBS

When asked about Idaho Public Television, Paula Kerger responds like a proud parent. The PBS executive says the station is the most watched in the country per capita, and points to the award-winning local programming as a reason why. 

But when it comes to the strength of the system across the country, Kerger admits the fragmented media landscape and shifting platforms has made things confusing for public TV at times.  

Alan Krakauer / Flickr

This week, we’ve been bringing you our Saving the Sage Grouse series. These reports range across the West and take an in depth look at the bird and its future.

Last year, the University of Idaho McClure Center took a look at the role of science in how the state was working to conserve the bird. A panel of Idahoans talked about how science has not only helped, but also challenged their thinking about the bird.

Bruce Reichert / Idaho Public Television

Idaho Public Television is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act with a sweeping hour-long look at Idaho's wild places. The program Outdoor Idaho traveled to all seven of Idaho’s wilderness areas -- and two proposed wilderness areas -- to tell the story of the state's protected places.

Idaho Public Television

In their last meeting before Tuesday's election, three men running to be Idaho's governor wasted no time in taking shots at each other's policies and ideas. The debate, hosted by Idaho Public Television, featured incumbent Republican Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter, Democrat A.J. Balukoff and Libertarian John Bujak.

Miguel Vieira / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Public Television plans to fight the U.S Forest Service over a proposal that would require its camera crews to ask government permission before filming on public land.

The Forest Service first introduced the rule four years ago as a means of protecting public lands from commercial interests.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

In June 1944, Robert Haga was on board the USS Chickadee in the waters off of Normandy. Now, a Boise resident, Haga is one of the D-Day veterans featured in a new NOVA special on PBS, "D-Day’s Sunken Secrets."

In the program, a team of experts explores the sea beds along the coastline of Normandy from above and below the water, inviting veterans like Haga along for the journey.

Courtesy Aaron Kunz

Idaho Public Television host Melissa Davlin says she doesn’t blame Idaho’s governor for insisting that long-shot candidates Harley Brown and Walt Bayes be invited to participate in this week’s GOP gubernatorial debate.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Pottery and porcelain expert David Rago says two things are certain when he sees someone pull out a dinner plate.

“I’m going to tell them it’s worth $3 and they’re going to be unhappy.”

That’s why, Rago says, appraising plates is the worst part of his 'Antiques Roadshow' gig. And he says he has to do it a lot. He’s been traveling with the popular PBS show for 18 years. Thousands of people bring antiques to Roadshow tapings, but only a few get to go on air to talk about their family treasures.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

April and Andy Davis don’t have many antiques. The couple doesn’t have much money to spend on collecting and they do have a 2-year-old, Hudson, who will pull down anything not nailed to the wall. But April Davis has been watching PBS' 'Antiques Roadshow' since she was a kid.

The popular public television show travels the country to appraise antiques people bring to the event. Some of the antiques, and their owners, end up on the program talking about their treasures and the stories behind them.

Ron Pisaneschi, Idaho Public Television
Idaho Public Television

Idaho Public Television's new general manager starts his job next week. The Idaho State Board of Education last week selected Ron Pisaneschi to replace longtime general manager Peter Morrill.

IPTV

The longtime leader of Idaho Public Television has announced he's retiring.

Peter Morrill will leave the station after starting his work there 34 years ago as a director and videographer.

He was later promoted to executive producer before becoming general manager in 1996. We sat down with Morrill and asked him why he’s retiring now.

Copyright 2013 Boise State Public Radio

The head of Idaho Public Television had some good and bad news for budget writers at the Idaho Legislature today. 

General Manager Peter Morrill said IPTV won 53 national and regional awards last year.  One of its premiere programs, Antiques Road Show, is coming to Boise to film several shows.  And…“Late last week we were informed by the good folks at Nielson and Track Media that we are in fact the most watched, most viewed PBS station in the U.S.," Morrill said.  "This is great news.”