Idaho Secretary of State

IIP Photo Archive / Flickr

Idaho officials say they’ll hold off on providing detailed voter information to the President’s commission looking into alleged voter fraud. States across the nation are now being told to pause.

On Monday, Vice President Mike Pence’s office sent out an email to states saying they should wait before sending the detailed information requested by the Trump Administration’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. Pence leads the commission along with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building Secretary of State Denney
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney says he's running for re-election in 2018.

Denney announced that he plans on running for another four-year term Wednesday. Currently, no other candidate is running for the seat.

Denney, a Republican, was first elected to the position in 2014 after serving nearly 20 years in the Idaho Legislature — including being a former House Speaker for three terms.

Lawerence Denney
Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Secretary of State believes a federal agency may have tried to hack the state's election website around the date of the presidential election without notifying Idaho officials in advance.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's IP address showed up as trying to access the state elections site around Nov. 8, Secretary of State Lawerence Denney said Monday. Similar accusations were made by Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp in December, reported The Post Register reports.

Lawerence Denney
Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney wants to reform the state’s Sunshine Laws. According to Idaho Reports, Denney plans to introduce new legislation in the upcoming session. Sunshine laws are used to make government agencies more transparent.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The Idaho Democrats filed a complaint in October alleging an official with the Idaho Republican Party violated the state’s campaign laws. Since then, the Secretary of State’s office looked at the issue – and says no wrongdoing occurred.

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building Secretary of State Denney
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Secretary of State's office says the Idaho Republican Party did not violate the state's campaign laws while creating a political attack ad against House Minority Leader John Rusche.

The decision refutes a complaint filed by the Idaho Democratic Party in October. Democratic officials alleged that Idaho Republican Party Executive Director David Johnston illegally coordinated with GOP candidate Mike Kingsley's campaign in creating a political attack ad against Rusche using funds from an independent expenditure.

Boise State Public Radio

Secretary of State Lawerence Denney will be working the polls in northern Idaho during Tuesday's election.

Nez Perce County Clerk Patty Weeks said Monday that she first invited Denney to work the May primary election, but the secretary had another commitment. So the two rescheduled for him to work the general election.

This will be the first election Denney — a former House Speaker in the Idaho Legislature — has spent as a poll worker since taking over the office in 2014.

Ada County election officials will recount votes for the county Commissioner District 3 seat at the request of a former candidate.

Sharon Ullman's request for a recount of six precincts comes after she lost in the May Republican primary to current Commissioner Dave Case. The Idaho Attorney General's and Secretary of State's offices will oversee the recount on Thursday.

Case had been declared the winner of the May election with 53 percent of the ballot, or more than 1,000 votes.

Boise State Public Radio

Voters have until the end of the day Friday to change their party registration with their county clerk. After that, they’re stuck with that party when the state primary rolls around on May 17.

Voters who took part in Tuesday's GOP Presidential Primary could decide at the polls to become a Republican. But that’s not how it works for this spring's state primary. Voters have to choose now whether to list themselves as Republican, Democrat or anything else.

Idaho Democratic Party

Idaho Democrats say billboards advertising the date of the state's Republican and Constitutional Party presidential primaries are misleading. The billboards specify in red letters "Presidential Primary March 8." But that date only applies to registered Republicans, since Democrats still plan to caucus for presidential candidates on March 22.

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building Secretary of State Denney
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s Secretary of State says he won’t put up billboards advertising the state’s Democratic caucus on March 22.

Lawerence Denney came under fire this week from the Idaho Democratic Party, which objects to 22 state-funded billboards that advertise the state’s presidential primary on March 8. The primary is solely for the Republican and Constitution parties, after Democrats chose to hold their event at a later time.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s Secretary of State office changes hands this week after 12 years under the same elected leader. Lawerence Denney takes over for the retiring Ben Ysursa, who has been Idaho’s secretary of state for three terms.

Ysursa leaves as one of Idaho’s most respected political figures. Denney – a former Speaker of the Idaho House - raised eyebrows when he filed to run for the office. Some saw the Republican from Midvale as too partisan to run the state office that oversees elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and business filings.

Ysursa says he has heard the whispers regarding what Denney’s plan for the office – and policies on voter access – might be.

Frontline.org

In the past few years, Idaho has made it harder for people to vote. In the past few years, Idaho has made it easier for people to vote. Both of those sentences are true according to PBS Frontline.

A recent article from the PBS show’s website features Ballot Watch, an interactive that lists 18 states that made it harder to vote and six states that have expanded voter access.

Idaho is one of only two states to pass laws since 2010 that make it both harder and easier to vote. Rhode Island is the other.

Courtesy Idaho Public Television

Idaho's Secretary of State Democratic candidate Holli Woodings is challenging Republican opponent Lawerence Denney to forgo his public pension.

Woodings announced Monday that she's challenging the long-term Idaho politician after he said he supported taking every elected official off the state's pension system during an Oct. 7 debate.

After serving nearly 20 years in the Idaho Legislature, Denney's pension will jump from $500 a month to $3,600 a month after his first term if elected.

The two candidates running to be Idaho's next Secretary of State faced off Tuesday in a debate hosted by Idaho Public Television.  

State Representative Lawerence Denney of Midvale, a Republican, debated state Representative Holli Woodings of Boise, a Democrat.

In a debate Monday, Denney was reported as saying that primaries should not be run by the state government, but by political parties.  

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