Idaho Transportation Department

Katy Mersmann / NASA

In the latest installment of our news experiment, we wanted to know what you've been wondering about the August 21 solar eclipse in Idaho. We got a lot of great questions, and because this is a once-in-a-lifetime event, Samantha Wright decided to answer all 17 of them.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

We’ve been asking you for questions and you’ve been sending them our way. In the latest installment of our news experiment, we meet Jordan Harris. He works for one of the big hospitals in Boise managing a team of couriers. The roads are a major facet of his job, so it’s no surprise Jordan’s question has to do the freeways.

ISP Corporal Dan Choma / Blaine County Sheriff's Office Facebook Page

This could be a record-breaking summer for deaths on Idaho roadways. The period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is so fraught with collisions and accidents it’s come to be known as the hundred deadliest days, and this summer is proving no exception.

 

 

Paul B / Flickr

We’re only midway through spring, but motorists should plan ahead as they drive across the state this summer. Magic Valley roadways will see lots of construction in the upcoming season.

The terrain of the Magic Valley may change heading through Jerome, Twin Falls and Burley, but a constant companion along the drive this summer will be orange cones.

ITD

"This is bad," says an unknown voice on the video. That seems to be an understatement, as 800 cubic yards of hillside slide down onto the roadway south of Bonners Ferry.

The slide was caught on video by Idaho Transportation Department workers on April 7.

Here's what happened: ITD Land Surveyor Mathew Wilson was checking out the stability of the hillside. As he videotaped, he heard popping and cracking coming from the site. Flaggers on the scene stopped traffic as horrified workers watched. Three minutes later, the hill slowly slides right down onto the road.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The Caldwell Chamber of Commerce is encouraging residents and business owners to write to lawmakers calling for the expansion of I-84.

The Chamber wants a 10-mile stretch between Franklin Boulevard in Nampa and the Franklin Road in Caldwell widened beyond the current 2 lanes in each direction.

Local leaders tell KTVB miles of traffic backups are hurting established businesses and scaring away new ones from setting up shop in the area.

Chris Pawluk / Flickr

Animal-car collisions are a real problem in Idaho. In one short section of Idaho 21 near Boise, 77 deer and elk were hit by cars in 2016. The Idaho Transportation Department will discuss the issue Wednesday and take a cue from how Banff National Park in Canada solved its wildlife mortality problem.

MjZ Photography / Flickr

One of the main corridors of the Treasure Valley, Chinden Boulevard, could be expanded to a six lane highway over the next 25 years according to long range plans from the Idaho Transportation Department.

The section of roadway between Meridian and Caldwell would first be upgraded from two to four lanes in the next 15 years. Once that’s done, work would begin to widen it to six lanes by 2040.

AP

The Idaho Transportation Department says it's going to re-pave a section of Interstate 84 between Nampa and Caldwell this summer instead of next year. 

Specifically, ITD is looking to refurbish the section between Franklin Boulevard in Nampa and Franklin Road in Caldwell during the warmer months.

daya_devi / Flickr

More than 123,000 people in the country need an organ transplant. And it turns out Idahoans are signing up in big numbers on the donation list.

According to figures released Monday, the Idaho Transportation Department says more Idahoans, 64 percent, sign up to donate their organs, compared to the national average of 51 percent.

In 2016, Idahoans donated 169 organs to those in need. That’s up from 113 in 2015.

Jethro Taylor / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho transportation officials put together a $450,000 emergency repair project when pavement on Interstate 90 broke apart this winter.

The Spokesman-Review reports Idaho Transportation Department officials say people's lives were at stake when a midwinter thaw caused potholes to open up on I-90 through Coeur d'Alene. The department patched the cracks during two nights in late January.

An extra thick bonding agent was used to help seal the asphalt patches.

Dean Shareski / Flickr

This winter’s snow and cold temperatures have taken a toll on area roads. And it’s not just piles of snow that are causing problems. On many streets there are new potholes to worry about.

Potholes crop up every winter, but back-to-back storms this season have made these road hazards blossom.

The Idaho Transportation Department says usually there is time after a winter storm for crews to put temporary patches on potholes. But with so many storms so close together, they can't keep up.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

If you drive on Idaho Highway 55, get ready for some construction slowdowns in the New Year.

For anyone traveling north from Boise to Banks, Cascade, Donnelly or beyond, Highway 55 is the main route, and an extremely busy one, especially in the summer months. Any construction project on the highway is of interest to travelers, especially one that will take 10 to 12 months and replace an entire bridge.

The Idaho Transportation Department will hold a meeting next week to talk about their project to replace the Idaho 55/Payette River Bridge.

The Idaho Transportation Department says the number of crashes involving teen drivers is on the rise.

The Post Register reports that in every category of crashes tracked by the department, the number involving teens increased between 2014 and 2015.

According to the department, drivers aged 15 to 19 were two-and-a-half times more likely to be involved in a crash.

Fatalities were up 70 percent from 2014, and serious injury crashes rose by 36 percent statewide.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A vital link between Boise State University and the heart of the capital city reopens today. The Broadway Bridge, which was constructed in just 9 months at a cost of around 20 million dollars, opens to pedestrians, bicyclists, and vehicles at 1 p.m.

Around 200 people gathered on the span of the new bridge to mark the opening just a day before the first home game at BSU.

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