Jim Risch

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Idaho’s legislative delegation in Washington, D.C. is weighing in on Thursday’s missile strikes against a Syrian airfield. The pinpoint military action used 59 cruise missiles to blast an airfield in Syria said to be the site where planes carrying chemical weapons were based.

Twitter: @SenatorRisch

Senator Jim Risch proposed a novel idea for protecting the nation's power grid from cyber threats. The senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee thinks we should rely less on electronics and more on humans to manage the nation's electricity.

The Republican senator cited a 2015 cyber attack on Ukraine's power grid as evidence for his proposal. Power was cut to some 215,000 Ukranians in the incident, but the outage would've been even more widespread had humans not still been in physical control of some elements of the grid.

Karl Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons

With backlashes at townhall meetings held by congressional representatives across the country, Idaho’s own Congressional delegation isn’t setting any public meetings with constituents during the current recess.

There’s a missing persons campaign afoot for Idaho’s D.C. contingent.

Posters announcing a mock missing persons campaign for Idaho’s D.C. contingent are making the rounds on social media and on street lights in downtown Boise. The posters say: “Missing: Have You Seen This Man?” and feature pictures of Senator Mike Crapo or Senator Jim Risch.

screenshot / YouTube

After this week’s resignation of retired General Mike Flynn as President Trump’s National Security Adviser, Democrats on Capitol Hill called for an investigation.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Images

Sen. Jim Risch (R-Idaho) has introduced a bill to give states more responsibility to manage conservation of the greater sage grouse. It comes as GOP control of Congress and the executive branch begin to shift western land management policy.

In 2015, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided not to list the sage grouse under the Endangered Species Act – instead approving strict land management plans that limit mining activities across 10 million acres.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Images

President-elect Donald Trump’s pick to head the Interior Department was questioned by a senate committee Tuesday. Republican Rep. Ryan Zinke was pushed on several hot button land use issues -- issues he’s well acquainted with as a Montana congressman.

 

When it comes to questions about how he would manage the relationship between states and federal land managers, the greater sage grouse inevitably came up. The imperiled bird narrowly avoided landing on the Endangered Species List, but the debate over how to save the bird remains contentious.  

Idaho Ed News

Ten years ago today, Jim Risch was a governor in a hurry.

Appointed in May 2006, Risch was halfway through a seven-month term when he convinced the Legislature to sign off on one of his top priorities.

Risch’s bill to slash property taxes for public schools by $260 million passed on Aug. 25, 2006, at the end of a one-day special legislative session.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In August 2006, then-Gov. Jim Risch promised Idahoans $260 million in property tax relief.

He did deliver a tax cut to property owners.

But he did not deliver Idahoans an overall tax cut, according to an in-depth Idaho Education News analysis.

Instead, in 2015-16, Idahoans paid an additional $21.7 million for K-12 than they would have paid under the old tax structure — mostly because they now pay a higher sales tax. 

Idaho Ed News

It didn’t take long for former Gov. Jim Risch to remind me how I was earning a paycheck 10 years ago.

In August 2006, Risch was midway through a seven-month stint as governor, and brokering a deal to slash Idaho property taxes.

I was editorial page editor at the Idaho Statesman at the time — and our editorial board came out against his plan to eliminate $260 million in public school property tax levies, and use a $210 million sales tax increase to make up most of the difference.

inciweb.gov

Three U.S. Senators were in Boise Monday to restate their support of legislation that would overhaul the way the nation pays for its biggest wildfires.

Senators Mike Crapo, R-ID, Jim Risch, R-ID, and Ron Wyden, D-OR, visited the National Interagency Fire Center for the third time in support of the proposal. 

Office of Idaho Senator Mike Crapo

An Idaho judge has been confirmed by a U.S. Senate Committee. Now David Nye faces the full Senate. The Spokesman Review’s Eye on Boise Blog reports Nye got unanimous support from the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday for the job of Idaho’s next U.S. district judge.

ulalume / Flickr Creative Commons

In Washington D.C., a bipartisan group of senators this week introduced a new piece of legislation dealing with nuclear energy, called the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act. Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo (R) and Sen. Jim Risch (R) introduced the bill with Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah (R), as well as Democratic senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island.

Update: Rep. Simpson (R-ID) has also released a statement regarding Saeed Abedini.

“Congress has been urging the Administration to secure the release of Pastor Saeed Abedini and other Americans wrongly detained in Iran for far too long, and the failure to do so was among the many reasons I opposed the Iran nuclear deal. I’m extremely grateful that these Americans will finally be returning home where they belong.” - Rep. Mike Simpson

Washington DNR

Lawmakers from Idaho and Oregon say they are renewing efforts to change the way the country pays to fight catastrophic wildfires, arguing that agencies should be using natural disaster dollars rather than money set aside for fire prevention.

Republican Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch of Idaho and Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon announced Wednesday that they are getting ready to pitch bipartisan legislation to Congress this fall.

Joe Jaszewski / Idaho Statesman

A new wilderness in Idaho is one step away.

The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed a bill protecting 275,000 acres in central Idaho.

The U.S. House or Representatives passed similar legislation last week meaning it now goes to President Barack Obama for his signature.

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