KBSU 903

Music Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 10, 2013

Hiromi: Finding Music In The Daily Din

Hiromi's latest album is called Move.
Sakiko Nomura Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 9:20 am

Japanese pianist Hiromi approached the making of her latest album with a love for all kinds of sound, no matter how quotidian.

"Even a car honk, I love it," Hiromi says. "Sometimes, when you are at the crossing point of the street, you hear different car honks at the same time and you hear amazing chords."

She says there's one particular sound from daily life that she could never warm up to, however, even though she depends on it to wake up: the chime of an alarm clock.

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World Cafe
2:03 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Ben Harper And Charlie Musselwhite On World Cafe

Charlie Musselwhite and Ben Harper.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 1:41 pm

Grammy-winning blues-rock singer Ben Harper has made 10 studio albums over the course of his career. For his latest project, he teamed up with harmonica legend Charlie Musselwhite to release a collaborative album titled Get Up! Musselwhite, one of the few white musicians to gain exposure in the blues scene during the 1960s, has released 26 records and was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2010.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
9:46 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Stacy Rowles On Piano Jazz

Stacy Rowles on the cover of Tell It Like It Is.
Courtesy of the artist

Stacy Rowles once wrote a note to her father, pianist and composer Jimmy Rowles, stating: "Dear Dad, if you buy me a flugelhorn, I'll play the [expletive] out of it." Indeed she did, and she picked up singing, as well. A longtime mainstay on the Los Angeles jazz scene, Rowles worked with the all-female quintet the Jazzbirds, led by the late multi-instrumentalist Betty O'Hara, as well as the Jazz Tap Ensemble and the DIVA Big Band.

Recently, host Marian McPartland remembered this 2001 session with Rowles.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:07 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

At 100, Composer Margaret Bonds Remains A Great Exception

Margaret Bonds in 1956. Born in Chicago in 1913, Bonds became one of the first African-American female composers to gain recognition in the United States.
Carl Van Vechten Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 2:35 pm

Margaret Bonds, who died in 1972, is perhaps near the top of the very short list of African-American female composers. Thanks to her partnerships with Langston Hughes and soprano Leontyne Price and others, she's remembered in some circles as an important figure in American composition. But, mostly, she's been forgotten.

"It's amazing that people don't know who she was, although she was quite well known in her time," says Louise Toppin, an opera singer and a voice professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Favorite Sessions
6:03 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Juan De Marcos And The Afro-Cuban All Stars: Dig That 'Dundunbanza'

Juan de Marcos González of the Afro-Cuban All Stars performs live for Jazz24.
Justin Steyer Jazz24

Many music lovers know Juan de Marcos González as the man who teamed up with guitarist Ry Cooder to create Buena Vista Social Club. But González was busy celebrating the history of Cuban music long before Cooder arrived on the scene.

Concurrently with the Buena Vista project, González was recording an album with his own band, The Afro-Cuban All Stars. The orchestra now contains expatriate Cuban musicians, young and old alike, from around the world.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:25 pm
Fri March 1, 2013

Marches Madness: John Philip Sousa's 'Washington Post'

Circa 1910: A program advertising John Philip Sousa and his band.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

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Deceptive Cadence
11:50 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Remembering Van Cliburn, A Giant Among Pianists And A Cold War Idol

A youthful Van Cliburn, captured mid-concerto.
Courtesy of the Van Cliburn Foundation

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:37 am

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Deceptive Cadence
6:03 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Benedict And Beethoven: The Outgoing Pope's Musical Life

Pope Benedict XVI addresses the audience at Milan's La Scala opera house where he heard a performance of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 conducted by Daniel Barenboim.
Daniel Dal Zennaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 7:18 am

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Music News
12:03 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Exiled From Iran, A Singer Makes The Case For Beauty

Strict laws made it impossible for the Iranian singer Hani to pursue her dream in her home country.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 7:03 pm

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Music Interviews
3:23 pm
Mon February 25, 2013

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper Emerges From Behind The Counter

Lady Lamb the Beekeeper's debut album is titled Ripely Pine.
Shervin Lainez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 1:31 pm

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World Cafe
2:16 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Sera Cahoone On World Cafe

Sera Cahoone.
Hilary Harris Courtesy of the artist

When she was 21, Sera Cahoone moved from Denver to Seattle to support artists like Carissa's Wierd, Band of Horses and Patrick Park. By 2006, she was focusing on her own solo work and releasing her self-titled debut album.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:20 pm
Mon February 18, 2013

From Bow To Baton: Violinist Joshua Bell Conducts Beethoven

Violinist Joshua Bell conducts the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields by doing what comes naturally to him. The celebrated soloist is also the London orchestra's music director.
Chris Chrisodoulou Sony Classical

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 5:16 pm

Violinist Joshua Bell has followed the lead of symphony orchestra conductors since he turned 7 and made his orchestra debut. But now he's the one waving the baton — or at least waving his violin bow. Bell recently took over the music directorship of the venerable Academy of St. Martin in the Fields.

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Music News
1:20 am
Mon February 18, 2013

'China's Leonard Cohen' Calls Out Political Corruption

Zuoxiao Zuzhou performing at his first concert in Beijing in two years on Jan. 18.
Yao Lei Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:42 am

Zuoxiao Zuzhou is a Chinese singer whose accented, croaky voice is hardly ever in tune. But for his fans he's the voice of a generation — one of the very few voices who dare to speak out. After a collaboration, Cowboy Junkies member Michael Timmins called him "China's Leonard Cohen."

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A Blog Supreme
2:02 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Survey The Portland Jazz Scene With Five Great Tunes

Pianist Darrell Grant is one of the anchors of the Portland jazz community.
Hiroshi Iwaya Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 10:19 am

No matter what a certain television series tells you, Portland, Ore., isn't all that weird. Sure, we make great coffee, ride bicycles, eat organic food — and, yes, there are a lot of hippies and hipsters here. But Portland is much more than that.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
10:53 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Bill Frisell On JazzSet

Bill Frisell plays John Lennon songs on the Fort Stage at the Newport Jazz Festival.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 7:37 am

On a video promoting Bill Frisell's album All We Are Saying, the guitarist shares the depth of his connection to John Lennon's music: "I don't know if I'd be playing guitar if it weren't for The Beatles." Frisell tells the story of how, several tours ago, a European presenter asked Frisell's band to play a Lennon set.

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Music News
12:03 am
Sun February 10, 2013

The Kentucky Fiddler Who Inspired Aaron Copland's 'Rodeo'

Fiddler Bill Stepp in Kentucky's Magoffin County in the 1930s.
Courtesy of Elsie Risner and Becky Arnett

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:29 pm

Sunday night's Grammys are an opportunity to rain accolades on pop music and perhaps witness the musical return of Justin Timberlake. But each year, the Recording Academy also honors recordings of "lasting significance" by inducting them into the Grammy Hall of Fame. One of them this year is Kentucky fiddler Bill Stepp's performance of "Bonaparte's Retreat."

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
12:52 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Jason Moran's 'Live: Time On The Quilts Of Gee's Bend' Suite On JazzSet

Jason Moran (left), Alicia Hall Moran (center), The Bandwagon and Bill Frisell (right) perform at the KC Jazz Club.
Scott Suchman Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 1:33 pm

The Philadelphia Museum of Art recently commissioned Jason Moran to write music in conjunction with its exhibition of quilts made by a remarkable group of African-American women in a small rural community on a bend in the Alabama River.

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The Mix
9:49 am
Thu February 7, 2013

The Mix: 50 Great Jazz Vocals

Billie Holiday topped Jazz24's list of the greatest jazz vocal songs with "Strange Fruit."
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 11:38 am

This audio is no longer available.

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Classics in Concert
9:39 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Max Richter In Concert: Reimagining Vivaldi

Composer-performer Max Richter (right) brings his revamped Vivaldi to Manhattan's Le Poisson Rouge.
Denise DeBelius NPR

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 1:00 pm

Can't take another moment of Vivaldi's ubiquitous Four Seasons? Neither could Max Richter, a London-based composer who deftly blurs the lines between the classical and electronic worlds.

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Music Reviews
2:25 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

Reissued And Relevant, Marcos Valle's '70s Bossa Nova Returns

Marcos Valle in Los Angeles in 1968.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 4:36 pm

Marcos Valle wasn't identified with Brazil's influential Tropicalia movement during the 1960s and 1970s. But, like his peers Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, he made ambitious and subversive pop music during those years, mixing American soul and rock with samba, bossa nova and other Brazilian styles.

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