KBSU 903

Deceptive Cadence
1:33 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Does Classical Music Have A Transgender Problem?

Pianist Sara Davis Buechner.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:43 pm

Yesterday, pianist Sara Davis Buechner published on the New York Times website a brave and moving account of her experiences as a transgendered person. "As David Buechner, born in the northwest suburbs of Baltimore in 1959," she writes, "I became an internationally known concert pianist. But from the time I was a child, I understood that I was meant to be Sara."

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Afghanistan
3:21 am
Sun February 3, 2013

From A Land Where Music Was Banned — To Carnegie Hall

Afghanistan's youth orchestra performs in Kabul on Jan. 31. The orchestra is coming to the U.S. and will appear at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 1:49 pm

In Afghanistan, there was no sound of music when the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001. The Islamist militants destroyed music CDs and instruments and even jailed musicians.

Today, there are music schools and young Afghans playing in public. And, this weekend, 48 Afghan boys and girls are traveling to the U.S. to perform at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

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Music Interviews
2:49 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Wayne Shorter On Jazz: 'How Do You Rehearse The Unknown?'

Wayne Shorter turns 80 this year. His newest album is called Without a Net.
Robert Ascroft Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 2, 2013 4:41 pm

The New York Times doesn't mince words when it writes, "Wayne Shorter is generally acknowledged to be jazz's greatest living composer."

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Deceptive Cadence
3:34 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Treasures In The Attic: Finding A Jazz Master's Lost Orchestral Music

Stride piano pioneer James P. Johnson had dreams of becoming a successful symphonic composer.
William Gottlieb

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 3:13 pm

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NPR Story
10:57 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Bill Frisell On Piano Jazz

Bill Frisell.
Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Guitarist and composer Bill Frisell brings his sparkling, atmospheric sound to this episode of Piano Jazz with host Marian McPartland, in a session that originally aired in October 2007.

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Live At The Village Vanguard
8:18 am
Wed January 30, 2013

David Virelles Continuum: Live At The Village Vanguard

David Virelles.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 5:57 am

David Virelles moved to New York in 2009 — and, following in a long line of Cuban-born pianists before him, quickly found himself in several bands led by elite jazz musicians. But Virelles also moved to study composition with iconoclast Henry Threadgill, and what he's come up with as a bandleader extends beyond music.

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Concerts
7:10 am
Wed January 30, 2013

McCoy Tyner: Live At SFJAZZ

McCoy Tyner at the SFJAZZ Center Opening Night concert.
Scott Chernis Courtesy of SFJAZZ

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 9:16 am

Few pianists have been as influential to modern jazz practice as McCoy Tyner. His harmonic and rhythmic conceptions, notably displayed as a member of John Coltrane's "classic" quartet, are instantly recognizable. And at age 74, you can still hear his driving left hand and dense chordal suggestions in fine form.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Petra Haden Covers Classic Film Scores With A Single Voice

Petra Haden's new album is titled Petra Goes to the Movies.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 3:36 pm

Petra Haden had a problem when she was a child: "I remember watching Looney Tunes cartoons and having the music stuck in my head," the singer and violinist says.

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Field Recordings
1:41 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

The Ebene Quartet Powers Through Mendelssohn

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 3:21 pm

The Paris-based Quatuor Ebene — the "Ebony Quartet" — has risen fast in the musical world with two separate artistic identities. In recent years, audiences have gotten to know the "other" Ebenes — the sophisticated cover band that plays everything from "Miserlou" (the Pulp Fiction theme) to jazz to "Someday My Prince Will Come" (yes, the one from Disney's Snow White).

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Song Travels
11:03 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Miloš Karadaglić On 'Song Travels'

Miloš Karadaglić.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:08 am

Classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić first studied guitar at the age of 8 in his home country of Montenegro, formerly part of Yugoslavia. At 14, Karadaglić was invited to play at a concert hall in Paris, and he later traveled to Italy to meet classical guitarist David Russell, who advised him to enroll at the Royal Academy of Music in London.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:03 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

Anne Akiko Meyers, holding the "Vieuxtemps" Guarneri del Gesu violin, which reportedly sold for a record price. She says the anonymous buyer has offered her use of the instrument for life.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 1:20 pm

  • Anne Akiko Meyers — the violinist who made news a year ago for an album recorded on her two Stradivarius instruments, including the then record price-breaking "Molitor" Strad, which she purchased for $3.6 million — announced yesterday that she's been given lifetime use of the 1741 "Vieuxtemps" Guarne
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Music Reviews
3:06 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Two Decades On, Vusi Mahlasela Still Sings 'To The People'

Vusi Mahlasela's new album, a live recording of his 20th-anniversary show in Johannesburg, is titled Sing to the People.
Erik Forster Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 5:36 pm

South African singer-songwriter Vusi Mahlasela came of age during the 1970s, an era dominated by the violent student uprising in Soweto. From the start, his musical expression has been about love and hope for his country. His songs play as anthems of South Africa's rise from apartheid to democracy and have helped earn him the nickname "The Voice."

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
12:01 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Ryan Truesdell's Gil Evans Centennial Project On JazzSet

Ryan Truesdell conducts the Gil Evans Centennial Project at Newport.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:18 pm

Gil Evans was born in Canada in 1912. He latched onto jazz and, in time, taught himself to write it. First, for dancers, Evans arranged tunes off the radio for the Claude Thornhill Orchestra as well as the sweet, warm sounds of flutes and French horns. Then Evans downsized the Thornhill sound to a nonet for The Birth of the Cool.

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Favorite Sessions
10:04 am
Tue January 22, 2013

The Lone Bellow: A Perfect Song For Singing Along

The Lone Bellow performs at Rockwood Music Hall.
WFUV

A lot is about to change for The Lone Bellow, a trio of Southerners who now call Brooklyn home: The band has yet to perform outside of New York, but its self-titled debut album is already charting on iTunes. Its members just quit their day jobs this month so they can go on tour.

You'll see in this performance why they're bound to connect with new fans on the road. Zach Williams, Kanene Pipkin and Brian Elmquist are natural, passionate live performers who play and sing infectious folk-rock in close harmony with startling confidence.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sun January 20, 2013

Red Baraat: A Bhangra-Powered Party Starter

Sunny Jain (center, with drum) leads Red Baraat. The band's latest album, Shruggy Ji, came out this month.
Erin Patrice O'Brien Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 20, 2013 6:54 am

Red Baraat is wild — and loud. It's also a genre unto itself. The Brooklyn ensemble self-identifies as "dhol 'n' brass," a hybrid of Indian bhangra and New Orleans big-band music.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Sat January 19, 2013

A Bagpipe-Slinging Spaniard Finds A Home In New York Jazz

On the new album Migrations, Cristina Pato plays the gaita, a bagpipe from her native region of Galicia in northwest Spain.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 19, 2013 12:18 pm

Cristina Pato is a jazz pianist from Spain who also plays flute and sings. But on her new album, Migrations, there's a striking sound not often heard in jazz: a bagpipe. Pato has been playing the traditional gaita (pronounced "GY-tah"), a version of the bagpipe from her native region of Galicia, since she was 4 years old.

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A Blog Supreme
8:41 am
Fri January 18, 2013

5 Blues Songs That Feel Your Midwinter Chill

Muddy Waters, c. 1979.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 19, 2013 8:21 am

In the Northern Hemisphere, January is typically the coldest month of the year. If we can somehow drag ourselves through the month, things will begin to turn around and we'll be on the road to springtime. But January often feels as if it'll never end.

So as we slog through the cold rain and snow, awaiting January's demise, here are five blues songs to help get us through the winter.

Deceptive Cadence
8:28 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

Conductor Andres Orozco-Estrada, who has just been named as the next music director of the Houston Symphony.
Martin Sigmund courtesy of the artist
  • After a five-year search that encompassed some 50 contenders, the Houston Symphony has announced its new music director: Andrés Orozco-Estrada. The 35-year-old Colombian trained in Vienna and will take over from the retiring Hans Graf, who is departing at the end of this season.
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World Cafe
2:27 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Rev. John Wilkins On World Cafe

Rev. John Wilkins of Memphis.
Courtesy of Andy Modla

We couldn't leave Memphis without a taste of the blues from gospel-blues singer and preacher Rev. John Wilkins. He's the son of Rev. Robert Wilkins, who wrote "Prodigal Son," a song famously covered by The Rolling Stones on Beggars Banquet.

Here, we've got a performance by Rev. John Wilkins with his band — and his daughters on backing vocals. During our interview, Wilkins spoke about his faith and his father, and even sings a version of "Prodigal Son" himself.

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Music
10:03 am
Sun January 13, 2013

'Global Village' Presents New Sounds From Spain

Barcelona-born guitarist José Luis Montón draws from classical influences, including Baroque music, in his flamenco compositions.
Dániel Vass Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 8:48 am

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