Kennewick Man

Brittney Tatchell

The ancient bones of the Kennewick Man have been returned to the ground.

The Tri-City Herald reports that early Saturday, more than 200 members of five Columbia Plateau tribes and bands gathered at an undisclosed location to lay the remains of the man they call the Ancient One to rest. That's according to an announcement Sunday by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

AP

The Yakama Nation and other Columbia Basin tribes are praising the passage of a bill in Congress that will return their ancestor, known as Kennewick Man, to the tribes.

The return of the ancient skeleton will allow the tribes to rebury him in the manner their people have followed "since time immemorial."

U.S. Sen. Patty Murray first introduced the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act and was joined by senators from Oregon and Idaho. Murray says a provision in the bill will start the process for returning the Kennewick Man to his "rightful resting place."

A skeleton that's about 9,000 years old is giving up a few of his secrets today. Monday, scientists who have a new book about the ancient remains found near Kennewick 18 years ago spoke to the press.

Brittney Tatchell

For nearly a decade, scientists and Northwest tribes fought bitterly over whether to bury or study the 9,500-year-old bones known as Kennewick Man. Now, after years of careful examination, scientists are releasing some of their findings to tribes at meetings this week in Central Washington.

Kennewick Man was buff. So says Doug Owsley. He’s the head of physical anthropology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and led the study of the ancient remains.