Kestrels

The Peregrine Fund/Bosch WebCam

The five kestrel chicks made famous by the Peregrine Fund’s Kestrel Cam will be banded Thursday as they get ready to leave the nest. Banding is when scientists put bracelet-like metal bands around the birds' legs to help monitor them in the future.

The Peregrine Fund

The Peregrine Fund’s American Kestrel Partnership launched its 2013 KestrelCams today.  Already the breeding pair has laid one egg. 

Last year, we told you about the project's kickoff in Boise to sign up citizen scientists to build nest boxes for these dwindling birds.  

The Peregrine Fund

The five baby kestrels born in a nest box at the World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise have grown up and are beginning to leave their cradle. 

The Peregrine Fund

The kestrels have hatched!  In a story we told you last month, the Peregrine Fund is asking citizen scientists to put up nest boxes and monitor American Kestrel populations across the U.S.  The American Kestrel Partnership has a box with a webcam posted at the

American Kestrel Partnership / The Peregrine Fund

It’s nesting time for many birds in Idaho, including the American Kestrel.  In fact, you can watch a pair of kestrels sitting on their eggs right now, through a live webcam.  It’s part of a new project by the Peregrine Fund that launches today to get people involved in helping gather information n kestrels.  The goal is to help scientists understand why the American Kestrel is in steady decline across North America.