Law & Justice

Wally Gobetz / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday in favor of the State of Idaho in a fight over Medicaid payments to providers. The decision could impact Medicaid's low-income patients across the state. 

The case began after a 2009 lawsuit against the state. Officials with Idaho's Department of Health and Welfare had recommended increasing payment rates to private medical providers who serve Medicaid patients.

Zacklur / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court says private sector health care companies cannot sue to force states to raise their Medicaid reimbursement rates to keep up with rising medical costs.

The justices ruled 5-4 Tuesday that the medical companies have no private right to enforce federal Medicaid funding laws against states if Congress has not created such a right.

The preliminary hearing for a 22-year-old southwest Idaho man charged in connection with the killings of a former Arizona power company executive, his wife and their adult son has been postponed after the defense attorney withdrew.

An Ada County judge on Thursday then approved Adam M. Dees' request for a public defender after Dees said he had no significant assets or a job.

Dees is charged with grand theft and forgery in connection with the killings of 80-year-old Theodore M. Welp, 77-year-old Delores E. Welp and their son, 52-year-old Thomas P. Welp.

Bergdahl Writing Reveals Idaho Native Was Tortured, Caged As POW

Mar 26, 2015
Taliban Propaganda Video Screengrab

Former POW and Idaho native Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl tried to escape captivity 12 times in five years he says.

The New York Times news service reports Bergdahl first tried to escape a few hours after he was captured by a Taliban group in 2009.

Bergdahl’s lawyer provided a page-and-a-half narrative written by the 28-year-old soldier. It’s the first public glimpse into Bergdahl’s own experience as a prisoner of war.

Now that he's been charged both with desertion and with misbehavior before the enemy, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl could be looking at life in prison if he's convicted.

Bergdahl abandoned his post in Afghanistan and was held captive by the Taliban for five years before being freed in a prisoner swap.

Bergdahl, Hailey
Drew Nash / Times-News

In Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's hometown of Hailey, Idaho, people have become reluctant to speak publicly about the soldier who was charged Wednesday with desertion.

Bergdahl was held for nearly five years as a prisoner of the Taliban and he's now facing charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Bergdahl left his post in 2009. He was released last May in a controversial prisoner swap.

U.S. Department of Defense

A U.S. official says the Army sergeant who abandoned his post in Afghanistan and was held by the Taliban for five years will be court martialed on charges of desertion and avoiding military service.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will also be charged with misbehavior before the enemy, said the official, who was not authorized to discuss the announcement publicly on the record and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The U.S. military plans an announcement at Fort Bragg in North Carolina Wednesday afternoon.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Authorities in southwest Idaho say a deputy responding to a disturbance at a home shot and killed a man who emerged from the home with a pistol.

Canyon County Sheriff Chief Deputy Marv Dashiell says the shooting occurred at about 11:20 p.m. Wednesday east of Middleton.

Dashiell in a news release says the deputy fired multiple rounds from his sidearm during the confrontation.

He says it's not known if the man fired with the pistol.

Lifesaving measures by the deputy and other emergency responders failed.

Names have not been released.

An Idaho sheriff says new evidence makes him confident there is no ongoing threat to the community following the arrest of a 22-year-old man connected to a triple killing.

Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney gave few details Friday about the active investigation into the killing of an Arizona power company executive, his wife and their adult son but says a diamond engagement ring taken from the home where the killings occurred has been recovered.

Detectives for several days had been trying to connect the ring to Adam M. Dees of Nampa.

Bail is set at $2 million for a 22-year-old southwest Idaho man prosecutors say is involved in the killings of a former Arizona power company executive, his wife and their adult son in the foothills outside Boise.

Adam M. Dees, of Nampa, appeared alert and relaxed during his appearance Thursday in Ada County Court via video feed from jail.

Prosecutors say police arrested Dees on Wednesday at an electronics store after he bought a car stereo using one of three credit cards belonging to the victims.

He's accused of grand theft and forgery but not murder.

Authorities in southwest Idaho say one person is in custody and police are searching for other suspects after finding two men and a woman dead amid a violent crime scene in a home in the Boise foothills.

Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney calls the killings "heinous" and says he's never seen anything as bad in his 31 years in law enforcement.

Raney said at a news conference Wednesday that the killings occurred sometime between Sunday evening and Tuesday morning.

He says police are looking for people connected to a 2003 gold Subaru.

reb / Flickr Creative Commons

Tax identity theft is increasing across the country and Idaho is no exception. The number of cases of people using someone else’s name and social security number to file a false tax return more than quadrupled last year in Idaho.

In 2013, there were 74 cases of tax identity theft. Last year, that number jumped to 352 says Idaho Tax Commission's Doreen Warren.

In the Tri-Cities, new facts are emerging in the police shooting of 35-year-old Mexican farmworker Antonio Zambrano-Montes.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

On February 11, 2015, KBSX hosted four panelists and members of the public for a discussion on the state of police and community relationships in Idaho.

Police-involved controversies in Ferguson, Mo. and New York City last year served as the impetus for the discussion.

Reports from a state investigator and three staffers at an Idaho prison suggest that inmates' medical records may have been intentionally changed or destroyed in violation of a federal court order.

If the reports from three staffers and an Idaho Bureau of Occupational Licenses investigator are accurate, the state corrections agency could be at risk of years of sanctions from a federal judge, including years of additional oversight by the court.

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