Law & Justice

Idaho Statesman

A 28-year-old southwest Idaho man has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for impregnating a 13-year-old girl.

David M. Arquette of Nampa received the sentence Monday in 3rd District Court and must serve seven years before becoming eligible for parole.

Arquette must also pay a $5,000 civil penalty, register as a sex offender and have no contact with the victim or any female under the age of 18 for the duration of the sentence.

Police arrested Arquette in January and he pleaded guilty in March to felony lewd conduct with a child.

C. Holmes / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Falls saw an increase in violent crimes in 2015, but state data shows criminal offenses are still below statistics from 10 years ago.

The Post Register reports that according to data from the 2015 Crime in Idaho report, the Idaho Falls Police Department received a total of 3,900 reports in 2015, which is a 6.4 percent increase from the previous year.

In 2005, reported offenses totaled 4,866, according to past reports.

Christian Lundh / Flickr Creative Commons

After fireworks sparked a wildfire in central Idaho that burned about 4 square miles, as well as a separate house fire in Nampa, public officials are pushing to reevaluate Idaho's fireworks regulations.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports that Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan and Nampa Fire Marshal Phil Roberts are calling for the Idaho Legislature to ban the sale of aerial fireworks, with are illegal to use in state but legal to sell.

Boise Police Department City Hall Logo
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Boise Police Chief William Bones says there was a palpable sense of heartache at BPD headquarters Friday morning after the shooting Thursday night in Dallas that killed five police officers. We spoke with Bones Friday after he completed a previously-scheduled bike patrol.

Bones says the Dallas shooting has made him more grateful for the relatively positive relationship his officers have with their community.

A federal judge says the Corrections Corporation of America will stand trial in December in a civil rights lawsuit over understaffing and violence at an Idaho prison.

U.S. District Judge Edward Lodge made the ruling Thursday.

Eight inmates at the Idaho Correctional Center sued the private prison company in 2012, contending that poor management and chronic understaffing led to an attack in which they were stabbed and beaten by a prison gang.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

The Ada County Sheriff says in less than 24 hours over the Fourth of July holiday, his dispatch office received 235 fireworks complaints and 33 reports of grass fires.

Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan says at least 12 fires in Boise were likely caused by fireworks over the Monday holiday. And the Table Rock Fire in the Boise Foothills last week, which burned a home, was caused by illegal fireworks. The Nampa Fire Marshal says illegal fireworks likely burned down a home Tuesday morning.

New DNA testing in a 1996 Idaho murder found genetic material belonging to an unknown man but no DNA matching that of the person currently imprisoned for committing the murder.

The Post-Register reports that DNA samples taken from the body of 18-year-old Angie Dodge didn't belong to Chris Tapp, who is currently in prison for her murder.

There was also no match to a second man who police suspect was involved with the murder.

An Oregon man who was arrested after authorities found a machine gun in his trailer is seeking to be released while he awaits trial on federal weapons charges.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that Michael Emry's attorney filed a motion Friday in federal court in Eugene seeking his release.

The FBI took him into custody in May in John Day, Oregon. FBI and ATF agents searched Emry's trailer, which was serving as his home, and found the weapon.

Grant Lindsay / Flickr Creative Commons

Coeur d'Alene Police Chief Lee White is scheduled to meet with law enforcement leaders and White House officials to discuss ways to build public trust and confidence in the justice system while maintaining public safety.

The Coeur d'Alene Press reports that White was one of several police chiefs from around the nation selected to attend President Barack Obama's 21st Century Policing Briefing. The event will take place Wednesday at the White House.

The Lewiston Police Department will no longer allow its officers to speak to reporters over the weekend under a newly implemented policy.

Police Chief Chris Ankeny tells the Lewiston Tribune that the change is needed because there is not enough staff available to answer press inquiries between Friday and Sunday.

Previously, officers fielded calls from reporters at their convenience during weekends. However, under the new policy, reporters must arrive at the crime scene to get information about the incident.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The group that helped get a new law passed that allows Idaho residents to carry a concealed weapon without a permit will celebrate with a rally Friday in Boise.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idahoans can carry a concealed gun without needing licenses or training starting Friday.

The change is just one of the new laws going into effect with the start of the new fiscal year in Idaho. This means the state will implement a new budget and plenty of new policies.

Other new laws include banning powdered alcohol, but finally allowing movie theaters to serve booze during movies that show nudity.

Boise Police Department Cop Car
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

Update, 3:44 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office says the Kuna man who died after shooting a Boise police officer late Tuesday night killed himself. Officials say Alan Amundson died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. In the announcement, the coroner's office also corrected Amnundson's age to show he was 53-years-old. A previous release said he was 52.

Update, 12:30 p.m.: The Ada County Coroner's Office has identified the deceased as 52-year-old Alan Amundson of Kuna. He died at the scene. An autopsy is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon. 

Neil R. / Flickr

In the last few days the U.S. Supreme Court has issued several major decisions. Perhaps the one that will have a direct impact on the most people in Idaho is last week’s split decision that effectively eliminates President Obama’s executive actions on immigration. Those would have granted temporary legal status to people whose children are legal U.S. residents (known as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans or DAPA) and to people who came to the country as children (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA.)

Scott Thomas / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court’s decision Monday to strike down a Texas abortion restriction law could have ripple effects in Idaho, where pro-choice advocates are cheering. In a 5-3 ruling, the justices overturned a Texas law requiring surgical facilities in abortion clinics, while also requiring clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Roadsidepictures / Flickr

Three men police say targeted two youths in a racially-based attack are facing felony hate crime charges.

Boise police arrested 29-year-old Christopher Daniel, 48-year-old Verdell Daniel and 27-year-old Thomas Caldwell on Sunday. All three have been charged with felony malicious harassment. Caldwell also faces misdemeanor battery and driving under the influence charges, and Christopher Daniel faces felony and misdemeanor battery charges.

KrisAlysha / Flickr

A Caldwell-based seed company has agreed to pay $200,000 in penalties to settle allegations that it illegally discriminated against citizens from outside the U.S.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the Justice Department announced the settlement with the Crookham Company on Monday.

A federal investigation from 2014 to earlier this year found that Crookham required non-U.S. citizens to show either a permanent resident card or employment authorization card to prove they were authorized to work. U.S. citizens had been allowed to produce any type of valid documentation.

An Uzbek refugee sentenced to 25 years in prison after being convicted of a plan to kill military personnel or civilians in Idaho has dropped an appeal of his conviction and sentence in exchange for dismissal of bomb-making charges in Utah.

The Idaho Statesman reports in a story on Thursday the deal also includes prosecutors in Idaho dropping their appeal that 33-year-old Fazliddin Kurbanov's 25-year sentence isn't long enough.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Twin Falls County Prosecutor Grant Loebs says it’s his ethical duty to not sensationalize an active criminal case, and that information on juvenile cases is even more sensitive. But after anti-Muslim conspiracy websites accused officials of covering up the sexual assault of a five-year-old girl, Loebs is publicly disputing these accusations.

Boise Police Department / Cold Case

Boise Police are trying to crack a murder case that’s 39 years old. Despite the passing of time, they’re hoping for new leads in a Cold Case that happened back in 1977.

The Crime: It was April 20, 1977. Oney Leiby, 62, was a night watchman at Thriftway Lumber in Boise. He was murdered in the middle of the night while on duty, leaving behind a wife and two grown sons.

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