Law & Justice

m br / Flickr

The Boise Police Department says there were two reports of sexual assault that were recanted in the past few weeks. But officers want to make sure anyone who has been the victim of a crime is not afraid to make a report. The Department also works hard to prevent crimes, like rape and sexual assault, before they happen.

Roadsidepictures / Flickr

Boise Police recently investigated two cases of sexual assault. One was reported near the Boise River and the other in west Boise. But in both cases, the women who said they were assaulted later recanted their stories.

Police issued a statement after the second case, saying they don’t want such incidents to keep other women from reporting sexual assaults.

Angie Munson is a detective in the Special Victims Unit at BPD. She’s been an officer for 27 years and has worked on over 2,000 cases, most of them sex crimes.

Lawrence Wasden
Idaho Public Television

The Idaho Attorney General says two Tennessee-based cancer charities labeled "shams" by the Federal Trade Commission have settled a fraud case.

The joint action by the FTC and all 50 states says James Reynolds, Sr. and others spent donations meant for cancer patients on six-figure salaries and luxury vacations.

The settlement with Reynolds, Cancer Fund of America and Cancer Support Services was filed Wednesday in federal court in Arizona. It must be signed by the judge before it takes effect.

Nampa Police Department

Last night, the Nampa Police Department turned into baseball players to show kids a good time.

The Department got a call from a gentleman who said the neighbor kids were playing baseball in a yard with a metal ball and bat. He was worried about property damage and wanted the police to respond.

WBEZ / Flickr Creative Commons

There’s a story you hear in small towns and big cities all over the country. It goes like this: a lot of people get addicted to prescription opioid pain killers like oxycodone. When they can’t get those anymore they turn to heroin because the experience is similar and heroin is cheaper and easier to get. Much of the United States is now experiencing what is widely being called a heroin epidemic.

In Idaho we have the first part of that story. Walter Bogucki is an inpatient counselor at Port of Hope, a drug treatment center in Nampa.

Dustin Moore / Flickr Creative Commons

Say what you will about the Internal Revenue Service, at least they won’t call you at work and threaten you with immediate arrest if you don’t give them money now. Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden says the IRS uses the mail. That’s an important distinction because nearly a million people nationwide in the last three years have gotten calls from someone claiming to be with the IRS demanding money.

John Locher / AP

You’ve likely heard the sound bites and watched the videos before

More than once, Donald Trump has suggested or implied that Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl should be executed for leaving his base in Afghanistan. Now, Bergdahl’s attorneys want to interview Trump, which could lead to him being deposed in the Army sergeant’s court martial. 

 

Amelia Templeton / OPB

Law enforcement says Oregon State Police officers were justified in the shooting death of one of the militants from the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

Malheur County District Attorney Dan Norris said at a morning press conference Tuesday that Oregon State Police officers fired six shots on January 26th. Three of the shots hit and killed Robert LaVoy Finicum.

41 Days: A Documentary

Mar 3, 2016
Dave Blanchard / OPB

In early January, armed occupiers took over a national wildlife refuge in rural Oregon. They said they weren't leaving until two local ranchers who had set fires on federal property were released from prison, and until the federal government handed its lands over to local residents.

Militants from all over the country answered the call of the occupiers to stand against what they saw as federal tyranny. The weeks that followed captured the attention of the nation and ripped the local community apart.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Maureen Wishkoski is a morning person. Wishkoski is the court advocate manager at the Women’s and Children’s Alliance in Boise. Most days she gets up before 6:00 a.m. and heads to the Ada County Courthouse, where she meets with clients in need of legal help.

Some of her clients are looking for relief from stalking, a crime that she says can have serious mental and emotional impacts. According to the national Stalking Resource Center, 7.5 million people are stalked across the country every year. 

Screenshot / gofundme.com

Idaho police believe four teenage boys set fire to their high school principal's house in retaliation for being suspended.

Payette Police Chief Mark Clark told the Idaho Statesman on Tuesday that he asked a judge to issue warrants for the arrest of three high-schoolers and one middle-schooler.

Clark says social media posts helped lead investigators to the suspects.

Still Burning / Flickr

A forum in Boise will focus on reform in the Idaho and federal criminal justice systems.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

Sean and Sandy Anderson of Riggins, Idaho, made some poor choices when they joined the occupiers at a wildlife refuge in Oregon, but they did nothing wrong.

That's the opinion of Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings.

Even though the couple posted videos and social media messages urging violence against the government, the sheriff says they were only exercising their First Amendment right to free speech.

Giddings told The Lewiston Tribune Thursday that the Andersons got swept up in the emotions of the moment.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

On any given day, several hundred prisoners of the state of Idaho are housed in county jails. For the last half year it averages to more than 630, and the state paid the counties about $1 million a month to keep them. They’re there for short stays, like if someone violates parole or has just been sentenced and it might take some time to get his or her spot ready at the state prison. 

Malheur Refuge Occupiers Go Silent

Feb 1, 2016
Bradley Parks / OPB

Update: 9:44 a.m. Monday - Lawyers for the leader of the armed standoff at an Oregon wildlife refuge have appealed a judge's decision to keep him in jail pending trial.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie Beckerman said Ammon Bundy presents a danger to the community and the Idaho resident might fail to return for future court proceedings.

Bundy's lawyers said in documents filed Sunday that their client should be released with a GPS monitoring device and orders he not leave Idaho except for court appearances.

Pages