Law & Justice

A judge is set to determine if a man accused of slaying three Moscow residents and injuring another man will face triple homicide charges.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the preliminary hearing for 29-year-old John Lee, also known as Kane Grzebielski, starts Thursday in the Latah County Courthouse.

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

New allegations of misconduct at the Idaho State Correctional Institution have surfaced in a court case that dates back to 1981.

The accusations include destroying, altering, or falsifying prisoner medical records. The state is also accused of deceiving a special investigator whose job it is to keep the state in line with past rulings in the case.

Utility, Inc. / Flickr

The Caldwell Police Department plans to purchase 50 cameras for officers to wear while they are on duty.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports Caldwell Police Chief Chris Allgood says the cameras will cost more than $80,000, including the cost of storage, software and salary for the person who will edit the video.

Allgood says the cameras will be worn by patrol officers, traffic officers, detectives and school resource officers.

SP8254 - On a Break! / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court’s decision Friday makes same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states. But it’s been legal in Idaho since last fall.

“It changes nothing for Idaho, nothing at all,” Shaakirrah Sanders says.

Michael Galkovsky / Flickr Creative Commons

The head of Idaho's state-run health insurance exchange says no matter what decision the U.S. Supreme Court made Thursday on the federal subsidies that are part of Obamacare, the state wouldn't have been affected.  

The court upheld the practice of giving subsidies to people buying health insurance in states that don’t have their own exchanges. Idaho is one of the 16 states that created exchanges.

Gay marriage, couples, lawsuit
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Supreme Court has declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States.

Gay and lesbian couples already can marry in 36 states and the District of Columbia. The court's ruling on Friday means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage.

The outcome is the culmination of two decades of Supreme Court litigation over marriage, and gay rights generally.

A southwest Idaho man police say quit breathing while being restrained by officers has died.

Authorities tell the Idaho Statesman that 23-year-old Allen Hernandez of Homedale died Tuesday.

Authorities say Hernandez got into a car crash on Sunday morning and asked to use the phone at a residence a quarter-mile away.

Police say he called 911 and said he wanted to go home before hanging up and getting into a fight with three residents.

Michael Galkovsky / Flickr Creative Commons

The ACLU of Idaho is suing the state over its public defense system. Public defenders represent people accused of crimes who can’t afford a lawyer, a principle enshrined in the constitution.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

  The American Civil Liberties Union is suing the state of Idaho over its patchwork public defense system.

The civil rights group contends that state officials have known for at least five years that high case loads, low budgets and a system that changes from county to county means that low-income defendants aren't being fairly represented in court.

The ACLU has brought similar lawsuits in several other states, reaching settlements in Washington, New York and elsewhere.

It’s a lawsuit that’s been going on since 1980 and it may finally be resolved. Known as the “Jeff D.” lawsuit, it focuses on children’s mental health services in Idaho.

Despite repeated attempts to resolve the 35-year-old case, it keeps coming back. At the core of the issue is Idaho’s system for providing care to kids with mental health problems. The plaintiffs says the state isn’t doing enough for those kids.

A jailed Nampa man accused of kidnapping and beating his ex-girlfriend now faces a new round of charges after he sent letters from jail asking people he knew to convince the victim to drop her allegations.

The Idaho Statesman reports 34-year-old Arturo Mendoza has been in Canyon County jail since February and is now charged with three counts of criminal solicitation to commit a crime.

Mendoza admitted he wrote the letters but denied any intent to threaten or contact the alleged victim.

Fazliddin Kurbanov Sketch
Ward Hooper / Idaho Statesman

Prosecutors are asking a federal judge in Idaho to shield the identities of two witnesses in the trial of an Uzbek man charged with helping a terrorist organization.

The Idaho Statesman reports that prosecutors argue the measure is needed because the witnesses are informants in ongoing cases.

If their request is denied, prosecutors want the courtroom to be closed to the public during the witnesses' testimony.

Lawrence Wasden
Idaho Public Television

Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden says the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is going after the wrong guy in their legal fight over instant horse racing terminals.

The tribe filed a petition with the Idaho Supreme Court last week contending that Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter's veto of legislation banning the betting machines is invalid because he didn't complete it within the required five-day time span. The tribe asked the high court to force Secretary of State Lawerence Denney to certify the legislation as law.

daniel / Flickr

This week, we’re going behind the scenes of Idaho’s Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC). Since 2008, the unit has made 237 arrests in Idaho. The yearly numbers have remained fairly steady for several years, hovering between 30 and 40.

Across the country, ICAC units have seen a consistent increase in the number of people arrested for crimes against children since 2000.

Utility, Inc. / Flickr

Officers with the Twin Falls Police Department will soon begin wearing body cameras.

The Times-News reports that city officials approved applying for a federal grant on Monday to help cover the cost of buying 55 body cameras.

Police Capt. Anthony Barnhart says uniformed officers and narcotics detectives will wear cameras either attached to their uniforms or glasses.

All officers will continue wearing audio recording devices.

Yannick Meyer / Flickr

Do you know what your kids are doing online? That’s the question Tim Brady asks when he talks about his work protecting children from internet predators. After nine years shielding kids, this Boise Police detective has some advice for parents when it comes to the Internet and safety.

A man convicted of burning down two churches has been sentenced to 85 years to life in prison.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports Bradley Thomasson was sentenced Monday after a jury convicted the Emmett resident in March of the arson of the Community Bible Church and First Baptist Church in April 2013. Thomasson was 41 at the time of the crime.

Both churches had been significantly damaged by water, smoke and heat. Damage costs totaled more than $2 million. No one had been injured in the incidents.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

This story includes graphic descriptions and language that may not be suitable for young audiences; some may find this content offensive.

Police Detective Tim Brady sits at his desk, surrounded by computer screens. He flips on a monitor and an instant-chat session is on the screen, this one recorded a few years ago. It is one of thousands of hours the Idaho Internet Crimes Against Children unit, (ICAC) has spent online.

“Within less than a minute I’m bombarded with all these people that think they’re speaking with a 13-year-old girl,” Brady says.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Concordia University's new Boise law school has been given provisional approval from the American Bar Association after nearly a yearlong delay.

The approval announced Monday means that students graduating from the law school will be eligible to take the bar exam in most states — a step that is required for those who want to become licensed practicing attorneys.

Idaho National Guard

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier who left his post in Afghanistan and was held by the Taliban for five years, is asking a military appellate court to disqualify the general with broad discretion in his case.

Bergdahl's attorney, Eugene Fidell, says Bergdahl filed the request Friday in the U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals in Washington.

Bergdahl wants the court to disqualify Gen. Mark Milley because he has a personal interest in being confirmed as the next Army chief of staff.

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