Law & Justice

Allen / Flickr Creative Commons

A southwest Idaho police agency says it will no longer respond to requests from parents seeking help disciplining children unless an actual crime has occurred.

The Nampa Police Department says the new policy starting Sunday is one of the changes intended to give patrol officers more time to do proactive police work.

Lt. Jason Kimball says the agency gets several calls a week from parents complaining about kids not brushing their teeth or going to bed on time.

Kristina Anderson

A woman who survived the mass shooting at Virginia Tech nine years ago is bringing her message of safety to Boise State University.

Kristina Anderson was in French class on April 16, 2007 when another student walked into her building, chained the doors shut, and started shooting at teachers and students. Anderson was shot three times. The gunman killed 32 people and wounded 17 others before taking his own life.

Now, Anderson travels the country telling her story and encouraging people to talk about safety in schools, businesses and public spaces.

FBI

Federal officials say an arrest warrant has been issued for a northern Idaho doctor found guilty of illegally distributing pain pills.

The FBI says 62-year-old Rafael L. W. Beier of Kingston skipped the verdict of his federal trial Tuesday and is considered armed and dangerous.

A federal jury found Beier guilty of 66 drug distribution and drug conspiracy charges. The verdict came on the second day of deliberations.

Authorities say that between 2012 and May 2014, Beier sold prescriptions for cash, meeting people at bars, parking lots, stores and in his office.

Authorities say an Idaho jail is no longer required to have federal oversight now that conditions have been improved.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the Canyon County jail has been under federal court oversight since the American Civil Liberties Union sued over what it called "indecent, cruel and inhumane" conditions there seven years ago.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

A southwest Idaho police department says three handguns, a rifle and a shotgun have been stolen from unlocked vehicles in the last week.

The Meridian Police Department in a statement Friday says it has taken more than 20 vehicle burglary reports in that span and all came from residents who didn't lock their vehicles.

The agency says the theft of firearms poses a potential threat to the public and police officers.

The agency says residents should lock their vehicles and not leave firearms in them.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Two Ada County sheriff’s deputies last week shot and killed 53-year-old Lee Easter in his southwest Boise home. Easter was, at the time, reportedly suicidal. The deputies say they tried to talk to him but that Easter pointed a handgun at them and they fired. That shooting is being investigated by the Ada County Critical Incident Task Force and being led by the Boise Police Department.

The Hitching Post / Facebook

A northern Idaho city has settled a lawsuit brought by wedding chapel owners who oppose same-sex marriage.

The Coeur d'Alene Press reports that Coeur d'Alene agreed Friday to pay the Hitching Post $1,000 but not to change its non-discrimination ordinance. The city attorney says the city hopes the settlement will save taxpayers' money.

The city's ordinance makes it illegal to discriminate because of sexual orientation but includes an exception for religious organizations.

DraftKings / Facebook

Two national daily sports fantasy contests have agreed to stop offering their games to Idaho consumers. 

The Idaho Attorney General’s office announced Monday an agreement with DraftKings Inc. and FanDuel Inc. Attorney General Lawrence Wasden says the settlement was reached after three months of negotiations.

“The concern I have is that the paid daily sports offerings provided by these companies constitute gambling under Idaho law,” Wasden says in a news release.

phone, office
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A new phone scam has hit the area, according to the Boise Police Department.

Scammers are able to manipulate the caller ID so the phone call appears to be from a BPD phone number. They claim Boise Police have a warrant out for their arrest on an unpaid payday type loan. The scammers say officers will arrest them unless the money is paid over the phone.

Antonio R. Villaraigosa / Flickr Creative Commons

Today, April 20th, is a bit of a holiday for marijuana enthusiasts. It's a day when they get together to smoke what has traditionally been an illegal drug. That on its own is not necessarily news. 

But it is the backdrop for this notion: Idaho is seeing a sharp decline in the number of new police recruits, in part, because it's easier than ever to smoke pot legally

m br / Flickr

The Boise Police Department says there were two reports of sexual assault that were recanted in the past few weeks. But officers want to make sure anyone who has been the victim of a crime is not afraid to make a report. The Department also works hard to prevent crimes, like rape and sexual assault, before they happen.

Roadsidepictures / Flickr

Boise Police recently investigated two cases of sexual assault. One was reported near the Boise River and the other in west Boise. But in both cases, the women who said they were assaulted later recanted their stories.

Police issued a statement after the second case, saying they don’t want such incidents to keep other women from reporting sexual assaults.

Angie Munson is a detective in the Special Victims Unit at BPD. She’s been an officer for 27 years and has worked on over 2,000 cases, most of them sex crimes.

Lawrence Wasden
Idaho Public Television

The Idaho Attorney General says two Tennessee-based cancer charities labeled "shams" by the Federal Trade Commission have settled a fraud case.

The joint action by the FTC and all 50 states says James Reynolds, Sr. and others spent donations meant for cancer patients on six-figure salaries and luxury vacations.

The settlement with Reynolds, Cancer Fund of America and Cancer Support Services was filed Wednesday in federal court in Arizona. It must be signed by the judge before it takes effect.

Nampa Police Department

Last night, the Nampa Police Department turned into baseball players to show kids a good time.

The Department got a call from a gentleman who said the neighbor kids were playing baseball in a yard with a metal ball and bat. He was worried about property damage and wanted the police to respond.

WBEZ / Flickr Creative Commons

There’s a story you hear in small towns and big cities all over the country. It goes like this: a lot of people get addicted to prescription opioid pain killers like oxycodone. When they can’t get those anymore they turn to heroin because the experience is similar and heroin is cheaper and easier to get. Much of the United States is now experiencing what is widely being called a heroin epidemic.

In Idaho we have the first part of that story. Walter Bogucki is an inpatient counselor at Port of Hope, a drug treatment center in Nampa.

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