Magic Valley

How Trump’s Immigration Crackdown Threatens The Dairy Boom In Idaho

Sep 20, 2017
Joy Pruitt / The Center for Public Integrity

There’s a cultural and economic collision occurring in southern Idaho. On one side, the anti-immigrant sentiment has expanded, fueled by conservative talk radio and the rhetoric of the Trump administration. On the other side, the dairy industry – long quiet – is speaking out about their reliance on a foreign-born labor force. And the prospect of a new contract for the county jail has both sides agitated.

AP

The total solar eclipse set to pass through Idaho on August 21 is conflicting with school schedules throughout the state. Educators are trying to determine if they should cancel classes, have a regular school day or, in some cases, move the first day of school.

College of Southern Idaho / Facebook

Part of the Trump Administration’s travel ban upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court has put a 120 day freeze on admitting refugees to the country. In spite of the ban, a refugee center in the Magic Valley doesn’t anticipate much impact.

Unlike the blanket ban on refugees announced in January, the revised one upheld in a June 26 Supreme Court ruling allows some refugees who have a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” to enter the country.

Charles Peterson / Flickr

After waters raged over Shoshone Falls earlier in the spring, the Bureau of Reclamation cut the flow of the Snake River over the scenic landmark to a trickle. However, the flow is going back up and the falls will again be a spectacle.

Whether a lot or a little water is flowing over Shoshone Falls, the landmark is something to see. However, when the amount of water plummeting more than 200 feet over the falls is greater than 15,000 cubic feet per second, the falls live up to their nickname: “The Niagara of the West.”

St. Luke's Magic Valley / Facebook

St. Luke’s Health System is distributing over a quarter of a million dollars in grants to Magic Valley nonprofits.

A group of representatives from 30 area charity groups gathered to be awarded shares of $275,000 in Community Health Improvement Grants from St. Luke’s.

Allison Lindley fiddle Shirley Bower
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Last weekend, the Fiddlers of Idaho State Championship was held in Hailey. Those with the top scores have now advanced to the national championships in Weiser this summer. 

There was competition at all levels, from the “senior senior” division of 70 and above, to the “small fry” division of eight and younger.

Contestants were judged on three fiddle songs: a waltz, a hoe down and a tune of their choice. But who wasn’t there was as important as who was.

Screenshot from video by Jason Urry / St. Lukes

Last month we told you the story of a Twin Falls doctor, who was once paralyzed, but was able to climb Idaho's tallest mountain. Now you can watch a video of his inspiring climb.

Jonathon Myers broke his neck ten years ago in a car accident. Paralyzed from the neck down, he fought back and learned how to walk again. He went to medical school and specialized in rehabilitation.

Leaflet / Wikimedia Commons

A hospital trying to raise money for a high-tech piece of equipment to help its patients might be newsworthy. Someone who was once paralyzed and is now climbing Idaho’s tallest mountain certainly would be. Now a Twin Falls doctor who thought he’d never walk again is climbing Borah Peak Wednesday in order to raise money for a machine to help his patients learn to walk again.

When officials at North Side Canal Co. realized that they needed to replace an aging concrete gate, they chose one that would pay for itself.

The Twin Falls Times-News reports that the new gate doubles as a hydroelectric power plant and is expected to generate $8 million worth of electricity over the next 28 years.

That's enough to cover the entire cost of the project.

Police in the Magic Valley  are investigating the mysterious disappearances of about 40 dogs. Investigators say they don't have any leads.

The first dogs began disappearing late last year. Since then, dogs of different sizes and breeds have been taken from yards, pens and garages. Several have been found dead while most have just vanished.