Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

An Oregon man who was arrested after authorities found a machine gun in his trailer is seeking to be released while he awaits trial on federal weapons charges.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that Michael Emry's attorney filed a motion Friday in federal court in Eugene seeking his release.

The FBI took him into custody in May in John Day, Oregon. FBI and ATF agents searched Emry's trailer, which was serving as his home, and found the weapon.

Deschutes County Jail

A self-styled journalist who traveled to Oregon in early January to spread the message of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers is facing federal weapons charges in Grant County.

But a man associated with a recovered machine gun says he was surprised to see the weapon turn up in a federal investigation, noting that federal agents hadn’t contacted him before or after the arrest.

Courtesy of the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

One of the defendants in the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon earlier this year has apologized for video rants he made that were widely seen during the standoff.

Sean Anderson, 47, told a federal judge Wednesday he was "embarrassed" and "ashamed" by the videos from the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. In one Anderson told supporters if police stopped them on their way to the refuge they should "kill them."

Department of Interior

In an address at the National Geographic Society in Washington D.C., Interior Secretary Sally Jewell stressed the need for what she characterized as a "major course correction" in conservation. Despite her location at the nation's capital, the majority of her comments were about places thousands of miles away. 

Amelia Templeton / OPB

Law enforcement says Oregon State Police officers were justified in the shooting death of one of the militants from the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

Malheur County District Attorney Dan Norris said at a morning press conference Tuesday that Oregon State Police officers fired six shots on January 26th. Three of the shots hit and killed Robert LaVoy Finicum.

41 Days: A Documentary

Mar 3, 2016
Dave Blanchard / OPB

In early January, armed occupiers took over a national wildlife refuge in rural Oregon. They said they weren't leaving until two local ranchers who had set fires on federal property were released from prison, and until the federal government handed its lands over to local residents.

Militants from all over the country answered the call of the occupiers to stand against what they saw as federal tyranny. The weeks that followed captured the attention of the nation and ripped the local community apart.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

Sean and Sandy Anderson of Riggins, Idaho, made some poor choices when they joined the occupiers at a wildlife refuge in Oregon, but they did nothing wrong.

That's the opinion of Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings.

Even though the couple posted videos and social media messages urging violence against the government, the sheriff says they were only exercising their First Amendment right to free speech.

Giddings told The Lewiston Tribune Thursday that the Andersons got swept up in the emotions of the moment.

Headwaters Economics

Between 1970-2014, rural counties with a lot of federal lands did better financially than those without as much federal control. That’s according to a new study by Headwaters Economics, a non-partisan think tank based in Montana.

Economist Megan Lawson led the study which drew averages from around the West. She says federal lands aren't necessarily the reason why those rural counties were better off, but that having federal land doesn't automatically spell economic ruin.

After 41 days, an armed occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge came to a conclusion Thursday morning. The four remaining militants at the refuge surrendered to federal authorities.

Amelia Templeton / OPB

Oregon conservation groups say volunteers are lining up to help reverse damage done to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge during the ongoing occupation.  

At the end of January, the Oregon Natural Desert Association put out a call for volunteers interested in doing environmental restoration at the refuge after the occupation is over. In just a week, more than 600 people from all over the Northwest have signed up.  

Malheur Refuge Occupiers Go Silent

Feb 1, 2016
Bradley Parks / OPB

Update: 9:44 a.m. Monday - Lawyers for the leader of the armed standoff at an Oregon wildlife refuge have appealed a judge's decision to keep him in jail pending trial.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie Beckerman said Ammon Bundy presents a danger to the community and the Idaho resident might fail to return for future court proceedings.

Bundy's lawyers said in documents filed Sunday that their client should be released with a GPS monitoring device and orders he not leave Idaho except for court appearances.


Ammon Bundy and his armed followers made ample use of social media while occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge, and federal officials are using those posts, videos and photos to build the case against them.

Two criminal complaints show that federal authorities have carefully scrutinized the group's social media postings and video interviews.

A day after the Jan. 2 occupation began, Bundy posted a video saying the group planned to stay for several years and calling on "people to come out here and stand" and "we need you to bring your arms."

Update: 8:00 a.m. Friday - A federal judge says she will not release any of the people arrested in the standoff at an Oregon wildlife refuge while the occupation continues.

The Oregonian reports U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie F. Beckerman made the comments Thursday during an initial court appearance in Portland for three of the 11 people arrested. The FBI said four people remained at the site late Thursday.

FBI Says Standoff Continues, Releases Video Of Finicum Death

Jan 29, 2016
FBI / YouTube

UPDATE: 11:30 a.m. Friday - OPB obtained audio of a conversation Friday morning from one of the four remaining occupiers of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. 

The remaining militants inside are David Fry of Blanchester, Ohio, husband and wife Sean and Sandy Anderson of Wisconsin, and Jeff Banta of Elko, Nevada.

During the conversation, Sean Anderson said the group is not going to negotiate with the FBI at this time, and they are prepared to wait until all their supplies are depleted.

Amanda Peacher / OPB

Update: 3:00 p.m. -  Law enforcement officers have driven a large convoy of vehicles into the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Four vehicles were seen leaving the refuge toward Burns shortly after entering. 

It’s unclear if the remaining four militants at the refuge have surrendered. But earlier today, two of them said they were willing to end the occupation if they could avoid charges.

Bradley Parks / OPB

UPDATE: 10:10 p.m. Wednesday - The FBI and Oregon State Police say they've arrested three more people connected to the armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in a remote Oregon area.

A statement said they arrested 45-year-old Duane Leo Ehmer of Irrigon, Oregon, and 34-year-old Dylan Wade Anderson of Provo, Utah, around 3:30 p.m. A few hours later, 43-year-old Jason S. Patrick of Bonaire, Georgia, was arrested.

The FBI says the men turned themselves in to agents at a checkpoint on a road near the refuge.

Militants Appear In Federal Court, Bundy Calls For End To Standoff

Jan 27, 2016

The federal government outlined its case Wednesday against Ammon Bundy and other militants charged with occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge.

The criminal complaint against the defendants was unsealed at the start of the proceeding. Many leafed through the complaint at the hearing with their lawyers. Others took them when they left the courtroom, as they returned to lockup. 

Media Leaves Refuge In Burns

Jan 27, 2016
Amanda Preacher / OPB

Most media outlets have pulled their teams out from the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. As OPB's John Sepulvado reports, media left the occupied area after militants began to act erratic in the early morning.

The FBI gave media a warning that federal authorities would begin to take action without consideration of bystanders. However, that was just an addendum to an already surreal experience near the compound.

Deceased Militant LaVoy Finicum: Rancher, Patriarch, Bundy Believer

Jan 27, 2016
Amelia Templeton / OPB

Robert LaVoy Finicum, who died Tuesday in a confrontation with FBI and state police on the highway between Burns and John Day, was a man whose life was transformed by the 2014 standoff between Cliven Bundy and federal officials in Nevada.

Bradley Parks / OPB


The latest on an armed group that took over buildings at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon (all times local):

12:49 p.m. Wednesday

A rancher who was killed during a traffic stop while in Oregon for an armed standoff at a wildlife refuge recently vowed he would die before going to prison.

Fifty-five-year-old LaVoy Finicum of Cain Beds, Arizona, died after law enforcement officers initiated the stop Tuesday night near the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.