Media

Washington, Lincoln and FDR are revered as leaders who helped shape the course of history. They are often referred to as “great” presidents. But is it possible to have a great president today? And is greatness a quality that Americans even want in their chief executive?

Aaron David Miller examines the history of the U.S. presidency to explore those questions in his book, The End of Greatness.  In the book, Dr. Miller makes the case that greatness as a presidential virtue is largely overrated – and that it occurs too infrequently to be relevant to current politics.

Domestic terrorism has taken many forms since the horrific events of September 11th. From these disparate acts, a sinister pattern of domestic terrorism has emerged as American Muslim men and women are radicalized from afar by extremist groups like ISIS.

Peter Bergen, is an internationally recognized expert on terrorism, a documentary producer and CNN’s national security analyst. In his latest book, titled United States of Jihad, Mr. Bergen discusses the social and political influences that can transform average Muslim Americans into homegrown terrorists.

The Lewiston Police Department will no longer allow its officers to speak to reporters over the weekend under a newly implemented policy.

Police Chief Chris Ankeny tells the Lewiston Tribune that the change is needed because there is not enough staff available to answer press inquiries between Friday and Sunday.

Previously, officers fielded calls from reporters at their convenience during weekends. However, under the new policy, reporters must arrive at the crime scene to get information about the incident.

PBS

When asked about Idaho Public Television, Paula Kerger responds like a proud parent. The PBS executive says the station is the most watched in the country per capita, and points to the award-winning local programming as a reason why. 

But when it comes to the strength of the system across the country, Kerger admits the fragmented media landscape and shifting platforms has made things confusing for public TV at times.  

screen grab builtinboise.com

A new online media project called Built in Boise launched last week. Its purpose is to tell the stories of local companies doing interesting things.

The website's first stories included a husband-and-wife team who sell gourmet donuts, a game designer, and a banker-turned-paddle-board mogul.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

During President Barack Obama's speech at Boise State, he bragged about innovation taking place in Boise and on the BSU campus. At least 5,000 people heard his remarks firsthand. But a lot of people who wanted to be there couldn't. The White House limited the number of tickets available. And, as Adam Cotterell reports, those who watched Mr. Obama on TV, may have actually had a better seat than those in attendance.

http://idahopoliticsweekly.com/

Idaho political junkies have a new option for getting their news. Idaho Politics Weekly launched Monday, right before the state legislative session kicks off Jan 12.

But unlike other traditional media outlets in the Treasure Valley, the website and newsletter are sponsored by Utah-based Zions Bank.

forest, cameras, media
Linda Tanner / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal agency under fire from free speech advocates and nature enthusiasts says it has absolutely no intention of charging people to take pictures on public land. The head of the U.S. Forest Service Thursday clarified a rule that’s been generating charges of government overreach.

“There's no way that our proposal will infringe on anyone's First Amendment rights,” says Forest Service chief Tom Tidwell. 

Miguel Vieira / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Public Television plans to fight the U.S Forest Service over a proposal that would require its camera crews to ask government permission before filming on public land.

The Forest Service first introduced the rule four years ago as a means of protecting public lands from commercial interests.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Satesman

When a developer decided to build a new tower in downtown Boise, it was big news. It was especially newsworthy because of its location: the corner of 8th and Main streets. That spot had been empty for more than 20 years, earning it the nickname 'The Hole.'

So when word broke that Zions Bank would build its new Idaho headquarters there, Idaho Statesman photographer Darin Oswald decided to set out on an ambitious project. He wanted to document the building’s construction through time-lapse photography. 

Courtesy of RTDNA

Boise State Public Radio’s website has been named the best in the country by the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA). The organization announced Wednesday, the winners of the 2013 national Edward R. Murrow Awards. These awards honor the highest caliber journalism being produced by radio, television and online news organizations around the world.