Mike Crapo

Nuclear testing during the Cold War sent radioactive fallout far away from the actual test sites. Politicians are moving to expand who can be compensated by the government for getting sick after exposure to that fallout.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

As catastrophic wildfires have become more common in the West, they’ve also become more expensive. That’s forced the Forest Service to raid money set aside for fire prevention and instead use it to pay suppression costs.

fossilmike / Flickr

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo’s bill to ease financial protections established by the Dodd-Frank Act passed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis got the green light from the U.S. Senate this week. Crapo’s proposal drew bipartisan support.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Since last week’s mass shooting at a Florida high school, many people are looking to Congress to make a change.

Nancy Harris

Before the Thanksgiving break, the GOP-controlled Senate is trying to get as much done on their tax proposal as possible. At the same time, a group opposed to the plan in Idaho has found a way to incorporate the holiday into their protest. 


Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

The number of Republican lawmakers distancing themselves from GOP Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore continues to grow. Idaho Sen. Jim Risch is the latest to join top Republicans in urging Moore to drop out after previously questioning whether the allegations of sexual misconduct were true.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Images

At the same time firefighters work to control the deadly flames in Northern California, a group of western politicians are pushing for a change in how these efforts are funded.


David Stillman / Flickr

In the wake of last week’s shooting in Las Vegas that claimed 58 lives and injured hundreds, Idaho's congressional delegation has remained relatively quiet on the topic of firearms.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo (R) has introduced a bill to expand sales of switchblade knives across the country.

 

 

Office of Idaho Senator Mike Crapo

Idaho’s newest federal district court judge was sworn in Tuesday after more than a year of delays. He’ll step right up to the bench and start taking cases.

President Donald Trump signed Judge David Nye’s commission letter Tuesday. That clears the way for Idaho’s first new federal district judge in over 22 years.

twenty_questions / Flickr

The Idaho Hospital Association, the Idaho Medical Association and other experts and health care providers under the banner of the Close The Gap Idaho coalition are expressing relief after the so-called "Skinny Repeal" of the Affordable Care Act perished Thursday night.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Idaho's Republican Senator Mike Crapo led the charge in the nation's capital to pass a bill Tuesday strengthening sanctions against Russia and limiting the President's ability to lift or interfere with sanctions.

Senate Democrats and Republicans came together in a moment of comity to pass the sanctions bill 97 to 2.

The bill maintains and tightens sanctions on Russia and empowers Congress, not the president, when it comes to overseeing diplomatic and economic restrictions on foreign powers.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Tuesday, the U.S. Senate narrowly approved a motion to proceed with GOP health care legislation. Idaho’s two senators voted in favor of the motion. Sen. Mike Crapo and Sen. Jim Risch both voted in favor of the motion, which required a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence to proceed.

The vote fell along party lines, but two Republican senators dissented.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Thursday, people critical of the Senate proposal to replace Obamacare staged a sit-in at Republican offices across the country. While the Senate is on recess, the protesters hoped to get the attention of their elected officials. In Boise, a group of women took a similar action – but with a maternal touch. Reporter Frankie Barnhill was there and filed this report.

Taylor Munson / Boise State Public Radio

Residents from around the state gathered outside the offices of both Idaho Senator’s Mike Crapo and Jim Risch Wednesday and Thursday. They demonstrated in opposition to the new Senate healthcare bill, called the American Health Care Act.

 

 

The bill is similar to the one passed by the House last month, with only a few modifications. Protester Laurie Burelle is concerned with the bill’s potential impact on women’s health.

 

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