Mike Crapo

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

The number of Republican lawmakers distancing themselves from GOP Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore continues to grow. Idaho Sen. Jim Risch is the latest to join top Republicans in urging Moore to drop out after previously questioning whether the allegations of sexual misconduct were true.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Images

At the same time firefighters work to control the deadly flames in Northern California, a group of western politicians are pushing for a change in how these efforts are funded.


David Stillman / Flickr

In the wake of last week’s shooting in Las Vegas that claimed 58 lives and injured hundreds, Idaho's congressional delegation has remained relatively quiet on the topic of firearms.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo (R) has introduced a bill to expand sales of switchblade knives across the country.

 

 

Office of Idaho Senator Mike Crapo

Idaho’s newest federal district court judge was sworn in Tuesday after more than a year of delays. He’ll step right up to the bench and start taking cases.

President Donald Trump signed Judge David Nye’s commission letter Tuesday. That clears the way for Idaho’s first new federal district judge in over 22 years.

twenty_questions / Flickr

The Idaho Hospital Association, the Idaho Medical Association and other experts and health care providers under the banner of the Close The Gap Idaho coalition are expressing relief after the so-called "Skinny Repeal" of the Affordable Care Act perished Thursday night.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Idaho's Republican Senator Mike Crapo led the charge in the nation's capital to pass a bill Tuesday strengthening sanctions against Russia and limiting the President's ability to lift or interfere with sanctions.

Senate Democrats and Republicans came together in a moment of comity to pass the sanctions bill 97 to 2.

The bill maintains and tightens sanctions on Russia and empowers Congress, not the president, when it comes to overseeing diplomatic and economic restrictions on foreign powers.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Tuesday, the U.S. Senate narrowly approved a motion to proceed with GOP health care legislation. Idaho’s two senators voted in favor of the motion. Sen. Mike Crapo and Sen. Jim Risch both voted in favor of the motion, which required a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Mike Pence to proceed.

The vote fell along party lines, but two Republican senators dissented.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Thursday, people critical of the Senate proposal to replace Obamacare staged a sit-in at Republican offices across the country. While the Senate is on recess, the protesters hoped to get the attention of their elected officials. In Boise, a group of women took a similar action – but with a maternal touch. Reporter Frankie Barnhill was there and filed this report.

Taylor Munson / Boise State Public Radio

Residents from around the state gathered outside the offices of both Idaho Senator’s Mike Crapo and Jim Risch Wednesday and Thursday. They demonstrated in opposition to the new Senate healthcare bill, called the American Health Care Act.

 

 

The bill is similar to the one passed by the House last month, with only a few modifications. Protester Laurie Burelle is concerned with the bill’s potential impact on women’s health.

 

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Both of Idaho’s senators counseled President Donald Trump in his decision to leave the Paris Climate Accord. Senators Jim Risch and Mike Crapo both pushed for Trump to leave the international agreement.

Crapo and Risch were among 22 senators who wrote a letter to the Trump Administration ahead of yesterday’s decision urging the President to step away from the accord, which was ratified by 195 countries.

U.S. Capitol, Washington, DC
VPickering / Flickr Creative Commons

The response to the President’s budget among Idaho’s political delegation in Washington, D.C. is tepid. The Trump Administration proposes cutting spending by $3.6 trillion over the next decade.

In a statement, GOP Senator Jim Risch reminded people that Congress, not the President, actually appropriates funds. Risch characterized the proposed budget as a blueprint of the Trump Administration’s priorities.

Karl Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons

With backlashes at townhall meetings held by congressional representatives across the country, Idaho’s own Congressional delegation isn’t setting any public meetings with constituents during the current recess.

There’s a missing persons campaign afoot for Idaho’s D.C. contingent.

Posters announcing a mock missing persons campaign for Idaho’s D.C. contingent are making the rounds on social media and on street lights in downtown Boise. The posters say: “Missing: Have You Seen This Man?” and feature pictures of Senator Mike Crapo or Senator Jim Risch.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Social media requests to flood the phone lines of Idaho’s congressional delegation seem to be working. Over the weekend, the voicemail inboxes of Idaho Sen. Jim Risch and Sen. Mike Crapo were full.

According to Crapo communications director Lindsay Nothern, the Boise office was fielding calls from Idahoans all Monday morning. Nothern says he personally took dozens of calls.

Mike Crapo / United States Senate

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo will start his next term in Congress by joining the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Crapo already sits on four committees, Budget, Finance, Indian Affairs, as well as Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs. Now he joins the Judiciary Committee.

Crapo will be part of the group that has jurisdiction for judicial and executive nominations - everything from Attorney General to the nation’s highest court. Plus, many district and appeal courts. Crapo says he’s ready to weigh in on a new Supreme Court nominee, to replace Judge Antonin Scalia, who died last year.

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