Mike Crapo

Mike Crapo
U.S. Senate

Idaho's Republican Sen. Mike Crapo said Wednesday that he has not consumed alcohol since his arrest last December near Washington, D.C.

Crapo was arrested in northern Virginia on December 23, 2012 after he was pulled over for running a red light. A test showed Crapo’s blood alcohol content was .11, an amount above the legal limit.

Cliff1066 / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho's Republican U.S. senators both voted against a bipartisan budget deal that now goes to President Obama for his signature.

Sens. Mike Crapo and James Risch on Tuesday opposed the plan that passed 67-33.

Like Crapo and Risch, all those against the measure were from the Senate's minority GOP side.

The deal marked a modest congressional accomplishment at the end of a year punctuated by a partial government shutdown, a near-default by the U.S. Treasury and congressional gridlock on issues ranging from immigration to gun control.

U.S. Capitol, Washington, DC
VPickering / Flickr Creative Commons

Legislation being supported by Democrats and Republicans in Washington has not impressed Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho. Crapo told reporters in a conference call Wednesday that he’s still examining the compromise, but that he is not likely to support it.

Wikipedia Commons

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo spoke to reporters at length Wednesday on the importance of reducing government spending, at the same time he spoke about keeping a program that Air Force leaders want to phase out in order to save $3.5 billion.

Crapo, a Republican, has joined Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-NH, and others to push legislation that would block the Air Force from retiring the A-10 fighter jet.

Idaho Senators Vote Against Gay Rights Bill

Nov 7, 2013
U.S. Capitol, Washington, DC
VPickering / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho's Republican Senators Mike Crapo and Jim Risch voted against today's historic vote on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, that gives workplace protections to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals.

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo voted this week against a federal ban on workplace discrimination against gay, lesbian and transgender people. But Tuesday he said Idaho cities should be able to maintain their local gay rights ordinances.

Courtesy of Sen. Mike Crapo's office

Update, Oct. 17, 9:23 a.m.

Associated Press:

Three of four of Idaho congressional members cast votes in opposition to the hard-fought legislation that ended the partial 16-day government shutdown and averted a potential federal default.

U.S. Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch voted against the bill late Wednesday, as did Rep. Raul Labrador when the House took up the compromise measure.

The partial shutdown of the federal government is taking a toll on the offices and staff of Idaho's four congressional leaders.

All four members of the delegation said they were scaling back constituent services and staff in their offices across the state and in Washington, D.C.

Republican Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch also say they intend to donate a portion of their $174,000 annual pay during the shutdown to charity.

Stethescope, Health Care, Doctor, Medical
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Federal officials insist people who enroll in Idaho's Internet health insurance marketplace starting Tuesday shouldn't fear for their personal-data privacy.

That's despite last-minute concerns among some foes of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul that more must be done to protect privacy.

Courtesy of Sen. Mike Crapo's office

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo says he first heard about Monday’s mass shooting the Washington Navy Yard through an email alert from the U.S. Capital Police.  He then watched media coverage where news outlets like the New York Times and CNN reported the shooter, Aaron Alexis, had used an AR-15 assault rifle. 

Courtesy of Sen. Mike Crapo's office

Memorials were held Wednesday in Idaho and around the country to mark the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks.

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo spent some time Wednesday remembering the confusion and fear of that day.

He was in the U.S. Capitol on September 11, 2001 when officials decided to evacuate the building. “There was a concern that the plane that ultimately crashed in Pennsylvania was headed toward Washington D.C," remembers Crapo. "As we evacuated, there was a tremendous amount of anxiety and fear and confusion among the people."

Julian Carroll, U.S. Navy / Flickr Creative Commons

President Barack Obama's primetime speech on possible military action in Syria hasn't changed the minds of Idaho's congressmen.

In a nationally televised address Tuesday night, Obama offered a rationale for greater U.S. intervention in Syria's sectarian civil war while acknowledging that winning the hearts and minds of Americans to back another Mideast conflict remains a struggle.

U.S. Senate

Members of Idaho's all-Republican congressional delegation aren't yet committing to a position on military action in Syria. But the direction most are leaning is against a resolution authorizing President Barack Obama to use air strikes.

A spokesman for Sen. Mike Crapo says the Idaho Republican is skeptical of authorizing military force at this point, especially without a broad international coalition.

Crapo’s colleague, Sen. Jim Risch sits on the Foreign Relations Committee, which heard the Obama administration's arguments for action in Syria.

Chobani, Greek Yogurt
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

New York based Greek yogurt maker Chobani has been chosen to lead a new pilot program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That program will feature the high protein yogurt in school lunches starting this school year.

Idaho, along with Arizona, New York and Tennessee will participate to see how cost effective it will be to offer this yogurt as a meat substitute for school meals.  If the test is successful, Greek yogurt could become a permanent fixture of the school lunch program across the U.S.  

Courtesy of Sen. Mike Crapo's office

Supporters of the Senate immigration bill got a boost today from the Congressional Budget Office.  The CBO report says the bill would boost the economy and reduce federal deficits.  But last night, the House approved an immigration bill increasing criminal penalties against anyone in the U.S. illegally. 

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