Mike Crapo

USDAgov/USUN / Flickr

Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, is adding his voice to other Republicans on the chance that UN Ambassador Susan Rice could be nominated for U.S. Secretary of State. “I do not believe she would be a good choice.”

Mike Crapo

Republicans are proposing their own plan to avoid the "fiscal cliff" at the end of this month. That's when Bush-era tax cuts will expire and automatic spending cuts begin.

The GOP plan would raise the eligibility age for Medicare, lower cost-of-living hikes for Social Security benefits and add $800 billion in higher tax revenue. The White House unveiled a plan last week. 

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo says U-S security is being threatened by the ongoing attacks on American embassies in the Middle East and around the world. 

The Republican condemned the violence during a conference call with reporters this morning. “The attacks heighten and give emphasis to the fact that the United States must continue to maintain its defense posture and its intelligence system in a way that will help us to defend our national security interests abroad.” 

metaroll / Flickr

A week ago, the U-S Department of Agriculture sent out a newsletter encouraging employees to take part in a Meatless Monday initiative.  The USDA said meat production creates greenhouse gases, wastes resources, and uses pesticides.  Now Idaho’s Mike Crapo and a handful of other Senators are expressing their displeasure. 

Idaho Lawmakers Weigh In On Supreme Court's Health Care Ruling

Jun 28, 2012
Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the majority of President Barack Obama's health care law.  

The high court issued its ruling in Washington this morning.  You can read the ruling here.

Now, Idaho lawmakers and policy makers are weighing in. 

Here's what some of them are saying:

Update at 2:30 pm MST

Senator Crapo's Office

The U.S. Supreme Court will make a much anticipated decision this week on the nation’s health care law.  Idaho's senior senator believes some parts of the law will survive whatever the court decides. 

Senator Crapo's Office

The U.S. Supreme Court decided Monday to reject a Montana law that bans direct corporate spending on state political campaigns. 

U.S.  Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) said Tuesday the Court’s decision dealt a blow to state sovereignty.  "I believe it should have gone the other way and it should have supported the state of Montana."

Montana’s one hundred-year old law conflicts with a U.S. Supreme Court decision called Citizen’s United that allows unlimited corporate spending in federal campaigns. 

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

U.S. Senators Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Jim Risch (R-ID) want the federal government to be more aggressive in opening the market for U.S. potatoes in Mexico.  They joined seven other senators Thursday in urging federal trade and agriculture agencies to push Mexico on the issue.   

U.S.  Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) said today he’s frustrated with the gridlock in Washington.  Decisions on the nation’s budget, debt, taxes, and other major issues have been put off repeatedly. 

Crapo believes these issues won’t be resolved until after the November elections.   He says, "Unfortunately, I don’t think any of the major things that we need to do will happen with the possible exception of a farm bill, on which we are developing some bipartisan support, and, hopefully, a transportation bill."

Senate Republicans in Washington, D.C. blocked a Democratic bill to keep some student loan interest rates from doubling.  U.S. Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) was among them.

Crapo says most lawmakers want to keep subsidized Stafford loan rates at their current 3.4 percent.  Republicans and Democrats, though, disagree on how to pay for it. 

A bill to protect victims of domestic violence comes up for a vote this week in the U.S. Senate.  Some Senate Republicans oppose the legislation because it expands prosecutorial powers for native American tribes, and adds protection for battered illegal immigrants, gays, and lesbians. 

U.S. Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID)  is a co-sponsor of the bill.  He says the provisions that have been criticized aren’t central to the legislation.   “I believe these are critical programs that need to be re-authorized and I’m going to be a strong advocate for it.” 

The Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. is hearing arguments on the Affordable Care Act.  One of the main questions is whether the government can force people to buy health insurance. 

U.S. Senator Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) opposes the law.  He suggests an alternative way to fund health care.  "Rather than having the government pay for the health care," Crapo says.  " The government could utilize the same resources to subsidize access to health insurance for those who are truly in need."

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