Military

Taliban Propaganda Video Screengrab

In public Facebook posts written before he vanished from his military base in Afghanistan, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl spoke of his frustration with the world.

He criticized military commanders and mused about how to stop violence.

But in his personal writings, he seemed to focus his frustrations on himself and his struggle to maintain his mental stability.

Together, the writings paint a portrait of a man who was dealing with two conflicts — one fought with bullets and bombs, the other fought within himself.

Updated at 11:51 a.m. ET

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Idaho Congressman Raul Labrador, a Republican, is calling on fellow politicians to avoid “escalating the rhetoric” around Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. He made the comments at a panel discussion hosted by the Heritage Foundation Tuesday in Washington D.C. 

Medical, Health Care
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

A new audit from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs shows that most Idaho veterans receiving care at the Boise VA Medical Center wait less than a month for their first appointment. But the average wait time for those who need to see a specialist is 52 days.

The wide-ranging audit, released Monday, is the first nationwide look at the VA network after an outcry arose over long wait times and cover-ups at the Phoenix VA center.

Taliban Propaganda Video Screengrab

A Pentagon psychologist says returned captives typically take anywhere from five days to three weeks to go throw the process of reintegration in which Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl now finds himself.

A senior U.S. official says Bergdahl has told people treating him at a U.S. military medical facility in Germany that he was tortured, beaten and held in a cage after he tried to escape from his Taliban captors in Afghanistan.

The Idaho Military Museum is back open for business after being closed since October 2013.  

The museum started at Gowen Field in the late 1980s and eventually moved off base into a nearby warehouse. 

Dept. of Defense

This post was updated Thurs. June 5 at 10:30 a.m. 

A Pentagon spokesman says former military captive Bowe Bergdahl's health is improving daily, and he is resting more comfortably and becoming more involved in a treatment plan designed to ease his return to the U.S.

The spokesman, Army Col. Steve Warren, said there is no date set for Bergdahl to make his first phone call to his family in Idaho or to be transferred from a U.S. military hospital in Germany to an Army hospital in Texas.

The response to Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s release from the Taliban on Saturday was jubilant at first. Then the story took a dramatically different turn. 

Hailey, Bergdahl
Drew Nash / Times-News

People in Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's hometown in Idaho say they're “shocked” by how quickly the captive soldier's homecoming has turned into a national controversy. Bergdahl was released Saturday after nearly five years in Taliban captivity. Since then, some fellow soldiers have accused him of being a deserter.

President Obama today [Tuesday] defended the deal under which Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed in exchange for high-level Taliban prisoners, saying his administration had consulted with Congress over a possible trade. And, he dismissed questions about how Bergdahl was captured by Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan in June 2009.

The mayor of the hometown of a recently released U.S. soldier is urging Americans not to judge Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl until all the facts are in.

Hailey, Idaho, Mayor Fritz Haemmerle released a written statement Monday saying the city has been inundated with phone calls and emails. They're from people on opposite sides of a national debate about whether Bergdahl should be hailed as a hero or tried in court as a deserter, or worse.

The release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in exchange for five senior members of the Taliban has been both welcomed as well as criticized.

Here's a look at why the release of a prisoner of war, usually a cause for unalloyed celebration, is proving so divisive.

Who is Bowe Bergdahl?

After five years in captivity, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is finally free. The American POW is now receiving medical aid at a U.S. military hospital in Germany.

The town of Hailey, Idaho, has waited five years to hear news of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's return. In 2009, Bergdahl was captured and held by the Taliban — first in Afghanistan and later, it's believed, in Pakistan.

On Saturday, he was released in a swap for five Guantanamo Bay detainees. Now Hailey, Bergdahl's hometown, is preparing for the next chapter.

Idaho National Guard

 

 

This post was updated at 4:37 p.m. on May 31, 2014.

President Barack Obama is welcoming the release of the lone U.S. solider held in Afghanistan, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

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