Travis Powers
Chris Goldberg / Flickr Creative Commons

Amid the bookshelves and paper stacks in the office of All Songs Considered Host Bob Boilen, Boise’s Youth Lagoon delivers an intimate “Tiny Desk Concert” that highlights the project’s new direction.

Since dropping his third album in September, Trevor Powers has gone on to impress with his strong melodic instinct and sense of direction within the songs of Savage Hills Ballroom.

Boise State University Special Collections and Archives

It was 65 years ago, deep in the Idaho wilderness, when one woman took poetry, turned it into music, and recorded it. Her collection of songs and poems lives on to this day, thanks in part to one dogged researcher and a librarian, both of whom wanted to share this special music with the world.

Singer songwriter Josh Ritter's eighth full-length album is streaming on NPR Music.

The Moscow, Idaho native recorded Sermon On The Rocks in New Orleans, and the songs have a southern honky-tonk vibe.

NPR Music gave the record a thumbs-up, saying the new record features some of Ritter's "nimblest wordplay."

Boise Hive

The Boise Hive is at a crossroads.

The nonprofit arts organization has until October 9th to raise $75,000. The Hive serves artists and musicians in need of mental health resources. The organization needs the money for a down payment to buy the building they currently rent, which has received an offer from another buyer.  

Youth Lagoon

Boise's own Youth Lagoon is a trending topic in music news this week. Led by Trevor Powers, the music project's third full-length album is set for release September 25. But before then, music junkies can stream Savage Hills Ballroom from NPR Music.


Boise-based musician Trevor Powers, better known in the music world by the stage name Youth Lagoon, is gearing up to release his third album, “Savage Hills Ballroom.” The new album is said to address breaking down barriers and acknowledging personal flaws.

Jack White Announces Surprise Boise Show, Twitter Goes Wild

Apr 22, 2015
Courtesy Becca Sayre

Jack White is performing an acoustic show tonight in Boise as part of his five-city surprise concert tour.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise rock band Built to Spill has officially released it's latest album, "Untethered Moon." It's the band’s first record in six years, and features two new band members. The group kicked off its current tour last month at Treefort Music Fest.

Built to Spill / YouTube

If you attended Built to Spill's performance during Treefort Music Fest this year, you probably noticed a weird pirate-looking guy on stage.

He came into view for several minutes during the Boise set (the first show of the band's new tour) and hopped around making bizarre gestures at lead singer Doug Martsch. The two intermittently interacted, seeming to talk with one another during the show while Martsch played. It didn't make much sense at the time.

Chad Dryden / The Record Exchange

Boise rockers Built to Spill will officially release their eighth full-length album next Tuesday.

"Untethered Moon" is the first studio album from the band since 2009, and features a new lineup with drummer Steve Gere and bassist Jason Albertini.

But as part of National Record Store Day, vinyl lovers will get an early chance to pick up the new record on Saturday.

Alex Hecht / Treefort Music Fest

Treefort Music Fest organizers had hoped to garner a wider audience of music fans this year, so they brought in a mix of well-known and under-the-radar bands for the indie festival. Over the course of five days, more than 400 bands performed at venues across downtown Boise.

Alex Crick / For KEXP

San Francisco band Geographer stopped in Boise this week to perform at the fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest, the same week the group released their third album "Ghost Modern." The album is their first since 2012.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The 2015 Treefort Music Fest ramps up Friday with the opening of its main stage in downtown Boise.  By the time the event ends Sunday, more than 400 bands will have entertained thousands of indie music fans.  One of those fans is journalist David Greenwald.  He writes about music for the Oregonian newspaper.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

El Korah Shrine is one of those buildings in downtown Boise people pass by all the time, but probably haven’t ever been in. In the last couple of years, Treefort Music Fest has exposed thousands of people to the venue – giving the old-school fraternal organization some new-found relevance with a younger crowd.  

Treefort Music Fest
Matthew Wordell

The fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest kicks off in Boise Wednesday. The 5-day event will take over much of downtown Boise, as 430 musical acts are set to perform (check out the 13 must-see bands).

I spoke with Emilie Ritter Saunders Wednesday during Morning Edition about Treefort. Here's our conversation.

Tyler Garcia / Treefort Music Fest

When Boise's fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest gets underway Wednesday, around 200 writers, bloggers and reporters will be covering the event. 

Kymm Cornelison is the festival’s publicity director.  She says music news outlets from places like Portland, Seattle, Denver, San Francisco and Los Angeles are among those represented.   

More media will cover Treefort in 2015 than ever before. The number of credentials has doubled since the festival's first year. As coverage has grown, so has the festival. 

Jeremy Conant / Treefort Music Fest

Yeah we know, 13 may seem like a pretty random number, but might as well choose a traditionally lucky number out of the dizzying 430 bands scheduled to play the fourth-annual Treefort Music Fest in Boise Wednesday through Sunday.

Clearly, the indie music fest has really owned the "go big or go home" ideal this year.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Treefort Music Fest would not be possible without the help of volunteers. When the indie music festival began in 2012, about 100 people offered to help get it started. This year, 600 volunteers will donate their time to Treefort. 

Volunteers allowed the festival to go from three days and 130 bands, to five days with more than 400 bands. Other genres like writing, film, and technology have also been added over the years.

Sheep Bridge Jumpers / YouTube

NPR Music announced the winners of their inaugural Tiny Desk Contest Feb. 12. Nearly 7,000 bands from across the country sent in their videos for the music gurus to judge, including some Idaho groups.

In the end, the winner was Fantastic Negrito, an Oakland act with a soulful performance filmed in a freight elevator.

The Native American Music Awards recognize indigenous musicians from the U.S., Canada and Latin America. It is considered to be the Grammys of Native American music.