Nampa

teamrealtyofidaho.com

Canyon County voters in Wilder, Notus, Homedale and Nampa appear to have approved school levies yesterday by wide margins. Nearly two-thirds of Nampa voted to pass a $1.6 million, two-year levy. Those same voters rejected a levy earlier this year for about twice that amount.

Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

Voters in several school districts in southwest Idaho go to the polls Tuesday. The Kuna School district will ask voters to approve nearly $3.2 million a year for the next two years. That money would be used to hire more teachers, reduce fees, plus maintenance and operations expenses. It could also mean the difference between offering drivers education or not.

teamrealtyofidaho.com

The Nampa School District is going into the school year with a $2.8 million shortfall. The reason: an accounting error that had gone undiscovered since last school year. That information comes to light as the district prepares for a $1.6 million levy vote August 28th. The question on many people’s minds is, how will the shortfall announcement influence voters?

The Nampa School District shocked its board and city residents Tuesday when it announced a budget shortfall of $2.8 million.  Because of accounting errors, Nampa superintendent Gary Larson told his audience, the district spent money it didn’t have.

The shortfall is in last year's budget, and it's coming to light at an unfortunate time: just as the district finishes making cuts to fill a budget gap for the year ahead.

Larson says the district's finance team caught the problem a little more than a week ago and alerted the deputy superintendent. 

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

The head of Idaho’s Department of Juvenile Corrections this week issued a statement saying young people who serve time at the state’s detention facility in Nampa are safe.  Sharon Harrigfeld  felt compelled to say that after 13 employees named her in a lawsuit that details alleged problems at the center.  Allegations range from unsafe working conditions, to sex between juveniles, and even impr

baseball.isport.com

The Nampa School District hopes the second time will be the charm. In August the district will ask voters for more money even though a previous attempt failed earlier this year.

This time Nampa schools are asking voters for $1.6 million. Compare that to the $3.58 million request Nampa voters rejected in March. The district thinks that smaller number will be easier to swallow.

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Many school districts in Idaho are negotiating teacher contracts. And because of the Students Come First education laws that passed last year, those negotiations now have to be done in full view of the public.

Before Students Come First all the public usually saw of school district contracts was the finished agreement. Now you can watch every offer and counter-offer, and every back and forth of the negotiation. This is the second year that’s been true. Students Come First went into effect in April of 2011. Many districts begin negotiations in April.

baseball.isport.com

The Nampa school district is short about two and a half million dollars for next year. The district and the local teachers’ union are trying to find a way to balance that budget in their annual contract negotiations. The district’s first offer made up the shortfall largely through teacher furloughs, an idea that didn’t go over well with the Nampa Education Association. After some back and forth, the latest proposal on the table calls for the district to make deep budget cuts instead. The largest part of that comes from staff reduction, mostly through attrition.

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