National Parks Service

grizzly bear, yellowstone
Xinem / Flickr Creative Commons

Getting hurt at Yellowstone National Park isn't quite as glamorous as you might think.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports that although the park is full of hazards like bears, bison, scalding water and canyons, visitors are most likely to be injured from mundane accidents like trips, slips and falls.

Bear attacks are dramatic but exceedingly rare. National Park Service statistics put the likelihood being injured by a bear during a visit to Yellowstone at 1 in 2.1 million.

  The National Park Service wants to increase entrance fees to pay for park improvements.

Jim Pasco / Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is reporting a record high number of visitors in October.

Just over 194,800 visited the park in October, surpassing the previous October record of over 189,000 set in 2010. 

There were over 3.4 million recreational visits to Yellowstone in the first 10 months of 2014, an increase of over 10 percent over the same period last year.

With two months left in the calendar year, 2014 is already the second-highest visitation year on record. The park's peak year was 2010, when there were over 3.6 million visitors.

According to a National Park Service report, towns around national parks lost an estimated $414 million during the partial government shutdown last October.

Snowmobiles, Yellowstone
Haglundc / Flickr Creative Commons

The National Park Service has released a new policy that will regulate winter access to Yellowstone National Park by people riding on snowmobiles and snow coaches.

The policy released Tuesday takes effect starting in the winter of 2014-2015. The new policy gets away from the current one of strict limits on daily numbers of snowmobiles in Yellowstone.

Video: What Two Bison Think Of The Government Shutdown

Oct 15, 2013
Screengrab from WyoShooter308 / YouTube

It's day 15 of the federal government shutdown and regional bison have had enough too. 

WyoShooter308 captured this video of two bison having a little fun with Grand Teton National Park barricades just north of Kelly, Wyoming.

Yellowstone, Mammoth, hot springs
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

The governors of Washington, Oregon and Idaho say they have no plans to reopen national parks and monuments using state dollars. President Obama has given states that option as the federal government shutdown stretches into day 11 and beyond.

Utah immediately took the president up on his offer.  A $1.6 million check to the federal treasury allows the Beehive State to reopen several economically important national parks and monuments.

But here in the Northwest, tourist magnets like Mount Rainier, Crater Lake and Craters of the Moon remain closed.

With economic impacts mounting and one Utah county threatening to take over national parks, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell says she will "consider agreements with governors" to allow state funding of national parks so that some can reopen to visitors.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Scientists are trying to understand how road noise affects animals. So they’ve set up a road of sorts in the hills above Boise and they’re capturing birds to find answers.

Heidi Ware holds an angry bird in her hand. “This is a Cassin's Vireo and they’re pretty well-known for being pretty feisty birds in the hand, so you can see he’s biting my finger right now.”