Native Americans

Rick Bartow / via Charles Froelick

Oregon-based visual artist Rick Bartow already had an accomplished career by the time he had a health scare late in life. The artist painted bold figures and canvases full of archetypal characters. He spent most his life on the Oregon coast, and grew up with his white mom in the small town of Newport. His father — a member of the Wiyot Indian tribe in California — died when he was 5.

Bryant Olsen / Flickr

A tribe says it will seek possession of human bones found protruding from an Idaho badger hole after tests determined they weren't from modern day homicide victims but belonged to people who lived five centuries ago.

 

Shoshone-Paiute Tribe Chairman Ted Howard said Thursday that Shoshones have occupied the southwestern Idaho area for thousands of years and the well-preserved bones of a young adult and a 10- to 15-year-old should be returned to the tribe for proper burial.

Screengrab / Idaho Statesman

The skeletal remains of two people were found in a badger hole near Mountain Home by Idaho Fish and Game officers this spring. The Elmore County Sheriff’s office initially treated the findings as possible homicides. The sheriff’s office sent samples to Florida and Arizona for carbon dating analysis.

Tuesday, officials released the results of the test – which found that the remains could date as far back as 1436 and are no longer being investigated as homicides.  It's estimated the bones of one belonged to a person who died around the age 20, the other likely belonged a teenager.

Jim Urquhart / AP Photo

Native American tribes, clans and leaders from seven states and Canada say the U.S. government's recent decision to lift protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park area violates their religious freedom.

They are suing to block the government from removing Yellowstone grizzlies from the endangered and threatened species list, which would allow Montana, Wyoming and Idaho to hold grizzly bear hunts.

Brittney Tatchell

The ancient bones of the Kennewick Man have been returned to the ground.

The Tri-City Herald reports that early Saturday, more than 200 members of five Columbia Plateau tribes and bands gathered at an undisclosed location to lay the remains of the man they call the Ancient One to rest. That's according to an announcement Sunday by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Michael Kappel / Flickr

The ongoing battle over appropriate Indian gambling is once again coming to a head in the Idaho Legislature, with both sides preparing to rip open old wounds.

Rep. Tom Loertscher, a Republican from Iona, introduced legislation Wednesday that would ban lucrative video gambling terminals inside the tribes' casinos. The proposal was tepidly accepted by the House State Affairs Committee, with some lawmakers raising concerns about the ripple effects of the bill.

tribalclimatecamp.org

Representatives from Native American tribes are in McCall this week to talk about how they can adapt to climate change. Donald Sampson says Native Americans are and will continue to be more impacted by climate change than the rest of the country. That’s because climate changes are affecting their traditional food sources.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Castle Rock sticks out of the foothills in northeast Boise. Native Americans called it Eagle Rock and the land below it was considered sacred. But the U.S. Army rounded up the area’s Indians and sent them to reservations to make way for white settlers in the late 1800s. The descendants of those people are gathering Friday in Boise’s Quarry View Park, which is on part of that land below Castle Rock.

Idaho State Historical Society

The University of Idaho is set to open its new law center at the renovated Old Ada County Courthouse later this summer. But university officials want to cover up a controversial mural depicting the hanging of a Native American by white settlers. Historians, though, don't want that to happen. 

David G. Steadman / Flickr Creative Commons

A new study says the five tribes of Idaho play a major role in the state’s economy. The study was put together by University of Idaho research economist Steve Peterson. It says the five tribes have a $1.1 billion annual sales impact on the Gem State’s economy.

The five tribes collectively raise the gross state product by $653 million, or about 1 percent of the gross state product in 2013.

Steve Peterson says a big portion of the money comes from tribal casinos, which have also helped to foster partnerships with local businesses and governments.

This is an encore broadcast of part 2 of the interview with Scott W. Berg, it was originally aired in October of 2013.

This interview was originally broadcast in October of 2013.

The Dakota War of 1862 and its aftermath would likely be among the most remembered stories of American frontier expansion in the 19th Century if not for one thing: The American Civil War, which was happening at the same time. As a result, the extraordinary story of the rebellion by Little Crow and his Dakota followers is largely overshadowed in history books and the American psyche by accounts of the brutal bloodletting on eastern battlefields called Antietam, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg.

The U.S. Department of Justice this week opened the door to a legalized pot market on tribal land.

HBO is planning a new six-hour miniseries on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Hundreds of thousands of Native Americans across the nation have started receiving the final cash payments this week from one of the largest government settlements in U.S. history.

Checks ranging from $869 to nearly $10 million were sent beginning Monday to more than 493,000 people by the administrators of the $3.4 billion settlement.

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