Nature

Cineminweb / Youtube

While bird activity has abated thanks to the recent warm weather, countless crows continue to spend the winter in Nampa.  The migratory birds seasonally mass in the city much to the chagrin of residents and business owners.

Films about nature and conservation in Idaho, the West and around the world are the focus of this year’s Les Bois Film Festival.

The Land Trust of the Treasure Valley and the film company Wild Lens are showing 20 films that highlight everything from kestrels to elk to Bogus Basin’s 75th anniversary to black footed ferrets.

Julia Rundberg is with the Land Trust. She says it’s a locally-sourced, homegrown, free-range, family-friendly, nature film festival.

Gary Lane / Wapiti River Guides

This picture has been popping up on social media. It’s an unusual phenomenon known as an “ice circle.” And this one was spotted by an Idaho river guide who snapped this picture while heading out for a hunting trip several years ago.

Gary Lane is a river guide and photographer. He and his wife Barb run Wapiti River Guides out of Riggins. He took the photo in 2009.

“I was driving up the road along the Salmon River above Riggins and I saw that ice circle, so of course I had to get out and take a picture of it,” Lane says.

This interview was originally broadcast in July, 2015

On July 8th, 1879, the USS Jeannette left San Francisco and sailed northward toward uncharted Arctic waters. Its ambitious destination: the North Pole, a place that had captured the imagination of 19th century scientists, explorers and the public, but that remained shrouded in mystery and wild scientific speculation. If the expedition succeeded, the American ship and its crew would be the first to discover what really existed at the top of the world.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

When a person loses their sight, everyday tasks become a challenge. Walking across the street, reading a book - even hobbies can seem nearly impossible.  But one Idaho man is working to introduce visually impaired individuals to a whole new world of sound. He’s teaching the blind how to identify birds, using only their calls.

Steve Bouffard has his eyes closed and he’s listening intently on the edge of Veterans Memorial Park. He quickly identifies a song sparrow, using only the sound of its call.

Rob Swatski / Flickr Creative Commons

Spiders are out and about in Boise. University of Idaho entomologist Ed Bechinski says it's early for Idaho spiders to be out of hibernation (specifically in their case it's known as diapause).

But Bechinski isn’t surprised these arachnids are out. He says southwest Idaho's unseasonably warm temperatures are plenty to tell spiders that spring is here.

Matthew Podolsky

For the last 35 years, Al Larson has been helping bluebirds thrive in Idaho. He loves bluebirds. He’s known around birding circles as Idaho’s “bluebird man.” “That’s what they call me. I haven’t sprouted wings yet,” Larson chuckles.

University of Idaho

University of Idaho geography professor Von Walden was among a group of scientists who were witness to a historic ice melt in Greenland last July.

What Von Walden and his fellow scientists saw in Greenland last summer—a weather event that resulted in 97 percent of Greenland’s Ice Sheet rising to temperatures above the freezing point—doesn’t happen every day.  “It’s really a remarkable event. The last time that the surface snow melted at this location was 1889.”