OSHA

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Thirty-seven-year-old Ruperto Vazquez-Carrera drowned in a manure pond in February 2016. The horrific death at Sunrise Organic Dairy in Jerome – followed by another seven months later near Idaho Falls – prompted federal investigations.


Jethro Taylor / Flickr Creative Commons

As Idaho's housing demands have grown, so has the residential construction industry.

But that boom has a dark side: The Idaho Statesman reports that construction-related serious injuries are a common problem, and some result in deaths.

A Statesman analysis of inspection data from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that at least 19 home-construction companies in the Boise region failed three or more inspections between March 2011 and December 2016 because of serious worker-safety violations.

Flickr Creative Commons

An Idaho construction company is formally appealing findings that it failed to properly train and protect its employees.

The Idaho Statesman reports that the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration found a lack of training by Hard Rock Construction was a factor when two workers died in a Boise trench collapse.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Federal safety authorities have fined a southwest Idaho company $77,000 following the deaths of two workers in a trench collapse in Boise.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration on Tuesday issued the fines to Meridian-based Hard Rock Construction.

Thirty-six-year-old Bert Smith and 26-year-old Ernesto Saucedo died when the trench collapsed on May 3 while they worked to install a sewer line.

Federal officials say the company failed to put in safety measures and didn't instruct the employees on methods to eliminate cave-in hazards.

Amanda Peacher / OPB

On Nov. 13, 2014, Tod Halsey noticed something strange about one part of the roof under the cut shop at Woodgrain Millwork. It was sagging between two beams.

“It was literally bowing,” said Halsey, a forklift driver who worked at the mill for 28 years. “It looked like it was smiling.”
 

“I told supervisors,” he said. “They came out and looked at it and said it would be all right.”

The sagging roof troubled Halsey, but he said even he would not have guessed what would come.

U.S. Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service says the death of a 20-year-old firefighter in Idaho last summer was a “chance” occurrence. The new report is in sharp contrast to the findings of federal workplace safety investigators.