Pets

Boise State University / via Twitter screengrab

Britta Closson adopted her dog Kohl about three years ago when the black lab was in pretty rough shape.

Diane Ayres / SNIP

Every day unwanted kittens and puppies are born in the Treasure Valley and one nonprofit is trying to help. Spay Neuter Idaho Pets or SNIP wants to reduce the overpopulation of dogs and cats in Idaho. Right now, they’re concentrated on the Treasure Valley.

“Spay and neuter your pets. It saves lives,” says Diane Ayres, SNIP’s founder and Executive Director. She says there are simply too many animals being born.

Elevated / Flickr Creative Commons

The Ketchum City Council this week passed an ordinance authorizing police to break into cars to rescue pets endangered by high temperatures. It may be the only city ordinance of its kind in Idaho. That could be because most law enforcement agencies don’t think it’s necessary.

Meridian Deputy Police Chief Tracy Basterrechea says even though his city doesn't have a specific ordinance on it, his officers have the authority to break into a car to rescue an overheated animal.

People in the Northwest are among the most likely in the nation to have pets. That's according to a new survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Washington, Oregon and Idaho rank in the top 10 for pet-owning households – with Oregon at No. 4, Washington at No. 6 and Idaho at No. 9.

Tom Meyer is a veterinarian in Vancouver, Wash. and sits on the board of the national vet group. He says it's not clear why the Northwest ranks so high, though rural states tend to have greater rates of pet ownership than more urban ones.