Planned Parenthood

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

A combative and sometimes angry crowd challenged Republican Rep. Raul Labrador during his town hall Wednesday night.

Labrador answered questions about everything from Planned Parenthood to public lands. At one point, he was asked whether he believes health care is a human right, to which the crowd responded with loud boos.  

“So no I do not believe that health care is a basic right," says Labrador. "When something is a right it’s something that must be provided by the government.”

The Stanton Project / Facebook

Planned Parenthood is suing a women's clinic in Idaho over the harassment of Planned Parenthood patients and employees in a parking lot shared by the two organizations.

Scott Thomas / Flickr Creative Commons

The Supreme Court’s decision Monday to strike down a Texas abortion restriction law could have ripple effects in Idaho, where pro-choice advocates are cheering. In a 5-3 ruling, the justices overturned a Texas law requiring surgical facilities in abortion clinics, while also requiring clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Idaho Gives / Facebook

Idahoans donated roughly $1 million to more than 800 nonprofits and charities Thursday as part of "Idaho Gives," the 24-hour, online fundraising blitz.

Organizers say nearly 7,500 people made donations to help the causes of nonprofits taking part in the fourth annual statewide fundraiser.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest gathered in around $32,000 in donations, claiming the top spot among large nonprofits. Meanwhile, The Idaho Humane Society attracted the highest amount of donors, with 358 people giving more than $19,400.

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood has filed a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn two recently passed Idaho laws that ban women from receiving abortion-inducing medication through telemedicine.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest in a lawsuit filed Tuesday says that the laws, signed by Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter this year, create an undue burden on women seeking abortions.

The new laws require doctors to be present when administering pregnancy-ending pills. It also requires doctors to make "all reasonable efforts" to schedule a follow-up, but it does not specify how many days later.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Women wanting an abortion won't need an ultrasound in Idaho. State lawmakers were considering a measure to make that the case.  Right to Life advocates wanted this legislation to persuade more women to say no to an abortion.  Over the last two months, the mandate sparked rallies and fierce debate.  Sen. Chuck Winder (R-Boise) said “I just see that there's a higher, at least in my opinion, need to protect the unborn and to respect the life of the developing child.”