Politics & Goverment

Stories about politics, policy, and how government works.

 

BOISE, ID – Idaho lawmakers signed off Wednesday on a plan that limits local control of oil and natural gas development.  But even supporters  say this legislation isn’t perfect.

Idaho Senators debated for nearly an hour on the powers of the state Oil and Gas Conservation Commission.  Under this bill, the agency has final say on where to drill for wells and how to develop the industry.  Democratic Senator Diane Bilyeu from Pocatello hoped to allow local governments to call public hearings on future developments.

 

BOISE, Id – Some Idaho lawmakers are weighing in on a national debate over whether religious institutions should be required to provide birth control coverage to employees.

 

BOISE, Id – An attempt to raise Idaho’s cigarette tax was snuffed out today in the Idaho Legislature.  Despite pleas to save lives and money, lawmakers objected to higher taxes and the effects on local businesses.

Heidi Low of the American Cancer Society led the charge.  Speaking before the House Revenue and Taxation Committee, she proposed raising the cigarette tax by $1.25 per pack.  Supported by a coalition of 24 other groups, Low said the goal would be to keep kids from smoking.

Idaho Lawmakers Consider Animal Cruelty Bill

Mar 12, 2012
Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

BOISE, ID – Idaho’s House of Representatives will soon vote on an animal cruelty bill.  House lawmakers in charge of agriculture backed legislation today that calls for penalties on people who torture pets.  The first two violations would be misdemeanors.  A third would be a felony.  Republican Representative Gayle Batt from Wilder has trouble with the bill.  She says, “Philosophically, I’m just really struggling with what to do with this legislation when we have abuse of children as misdemeanors and then we have for animals a felony.”  Child abuse can be considered a misdemeanor in Idaho i

 

BOISE, ID – Voters throughout Idaho decide Tuesday on raising property taxes for public schools.  But it can be unclear where to vote if you live in Ada County.

Where people go to cast votes on supplemental school levies in Canyon County is pretty clear.  The website directs them to their usual polling places.  But where to go in Ada County is murkier.  Phil McGrane is Chief Deputy at the County Clerk’s office.  He says voters won’t find this information on their website.

Idahoans Rally On Ultrasound Abortion Bill

Mar 8, 2012

BOISE, ID –  Yesterday, Virginia joined 7 other states that require women to have an ultrasound before an abortion.  Another 12 states are considering similar bills, including Idaho.  Opponents and a few supporters of the bill rallied at the Idaho Capitol today.

About a hundred people rallied against the ultrasound requirement.   They held signs that read “Ultra Un-Sound!” and “Hands Off Our Uteri!”  Kendra Womack of Boise took part with her 7-month old son.

BOISE, ID – More than 40,000 people took part in Idaho’s first Republican presidential caucus.  Ada County’s caucus – the largest in the state – may have started late, but it ended after one round of voting.

Dozens of people showed up early to Boise State’s Taco Bell Arena. They waited in line, anxious for the doors to open.  For 67-year old Robert Austin, standing by the Republican Party is more important than who he’ll support initially.

 

BOISE, ID – The four major Republican presidential candidates will be on the ballot at Idaho’s first GOP caucus.  Mitt Romney, Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich, and Rick Santorum.  But who will win?  Republican PartyExecutive Director Jonathan Parker thinks Idaho’s 32 delegates are up for grabs.

 

BOISE, ID –Republican party members are gathering at locations around the state this evening, for the 44 caucuses.  Once inside the caucus, Jonathan Parker, head of Idaho’s Republican Party, explains the process.

Jonathan Parker “If no candidate receives a simple majority after the first vote, we do another round of voting, where we drop off any candidate who receives 15 percent or less, or any candidate who’s in last place and we continue voting until one candidate receives a simple majority or two candidates split the vote evenly at 50 percent.”

 

BOISE, ID – Voters in ten states including Idaho choose their Republican presidential candidate tomorrow as part of Super Tuesday.  It’s “Super” because more than 400 delegates will be divided up.  Scott Ki reports on how Idaho’s GOP delegates stack up with other states.

 

BOISE, ID – Idaho Republicans are getting ready for Tuesday evening’s presidential caucus.  GOP leaders in each county run their own show.  Canyon County’s will be held at the Idaho Center.

Once inside the main doors of the Idaho Center, every voter checks in.  They must be registered as Republicans to participate.  They can do so on site.   Brandon Hixon is in charge of Canyon County’s GOP presidential caucus.  He says each participant gets a slip of paper that allows them one token for each round of voting.  This is how they’ll vote.

BOISE, ID – Idaho Republicans are getting ready for Tuesday evening’s presidential caucus.  GOP leaders in each county run their own show.  Canyon County’s will be held at the Idaho Center.

Once inside the main doors of the Idaho Center, every voter checks in.  They must be registered as Republicans to participate.  They can do so on site.   Brandon Hixon is in charge of Canyon County’s GOP presidential caucus.  He says each participant gets a slip of paper that allows them one token for each round of voting.  This is how they’ll vote.

BOISE, ID – Voters in ten states including Idaho choose their Republican presidential candidate tomorrow as part of Super Tuesday.  It’s “Super” because more than 400 delegates will be divided up.  Scott Ki reports on how Idaho’s GOP delegates stack up with other states.

Jonathan Parker

BOISE, Id –Idaho’s Republican Party holds its first presidential caucus Tuesday.  Party leaders decided to move from a May Primary to a Super Tuesday caucus last summer. At that time Idaho’s GOP executive director Jonathan Parker said the decision came because the party was tired of candidates stopping briefly in Idaho to raise some money then leave for other states.

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