Protest

Nancy Harris

Before the Thanksgiving break, the GOP-controlled Senate is trying to get as much done on their tax proposal as possible. At the same time, a group opposed to the plan in Idaho has found a way to incorporate the holiday into their protest. 


AP Photo / Kimberlee Kruesi

Editor's note: Author Charles Murray has repeatedly rejected characterizations that he is a white supremacist. We've updated the story to make that clear.

A group that protested an Idaho appearance by U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan earlier this week is planning a different kind of demonstration against a speech by a controversial author this weekend.


Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

Thursday, people critical of the Senate proposal to replace Obamacare staged a sit-in at Republican offices across the country. While the Senate is on recess, the protesters hoped to get the attention of their elected officials. In Boise, a group of women took a similar action – but with a maternal touch. Reporter Frankie Barnhill was there and filed this report.

Taylor Munson / Boise State Public Radio

Residents from around the state gathered outside the offices of both Idaho Senator’s Mike Crapo and Jim Risch Wednesday and Thursday. They demonstrated in opposition to the new Senate healthcare bill, called the American Health Care Act.

 

 

The bill is similar to the one passed by the House last month, with only a few modifications. Protester Laurie Burelle is concerned with the bill’s potential impact on women’s health.

 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Wednesday afternoon, a group of about 25 protesters gathered on the steps of the Idaho Capitol to show their opposition to president-elect Donald Trump.

Whitnee Kieran held a bright yellow poster, with the message “He is Not My President” written in marker. Kieran says she moved from shock to terror on Election Night, as she watched Donald Trump take the lead.

Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Dozens of protestors marched on the Idaho Capitol in Boise on Saturday afternoon, in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. They chanted down the center of Capitol Boulevard, carrying signs that read “Black Lives Matter” and “He Complied But He Still Died,” referring to the police-related shootings of Philando Castile in Minnesota and Alton Sterling in Louisiana. Virginia Farr, who is white, attended with her three black daughters.

New Approach Idaho

Friday afternoon on the steps of Idaho’s Capitol a group of people plan to break the law. It’s a protest that could come with some serious repercussions for those involved.

Idaho has some of the strictest marijuana laws in the country. If Serra Frank is caught with an ounce, she could reasonably expect to pay a $1,000 fine and spend a year in jail. But Frank says she will be smoking pot at the Capitol on January 1 anyway. 

This story was updated at 12:05 p.m.

More than 20 gay rights activists have been arrested after protesting in the Idaho House and Senate chambers in an attempt to pressure lawmakers into passing anti-discrimination protections.

Activists taking part in the protest that started Monday morning warned they would not voluntarily leave until legislators consider adding four words — sexual orientation and gender identity — to the Idaho Human Rights Act.

Add The Words
Frankie Barnhill / For Boise State Public Radio

During the legislative session, dozens of people protested inside and outside the Idaho Capitol against discrimination. Monday is their chance to stand up in court and say why they did it.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An anti-abortion organization says Boise State University is violating free speech laws by limiting students' protest to just a handful of areas on campus.

Abolitionists4Life filed the lawsuit against the university Friday. They argue that BSU is violating their First Amendment rights.

The group says the university required them to put up warning signs during a May protest because officials considered their material controversial.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s 2014 legislative session may well be defined by protests. Gay rights advocates stepped up pressure on lawmakers to extend discrimination protections to gays, lesbians and transgender people. More than 100 people were arrested in numerous protests. Those were well choreographed and featured people standing silently, each with a hand over his or her mouth. Now, organizers are bringing this distinctive strategy to other parts of the state.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

This winter, protests hit the Idaho Capitol at a level rarely seen in Boise. Gay rights activists blocked entrances and were marched away in handcuffs.

They want Idaho's Republican-controlled Legislature to pass an anti-discrimination law similar to those in Oregon and Washington. It would make it illegal for employers, landlords and most businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

But lawmakers plan to wrap up the session this Friday without ever printing the bill.

Pressure through civil disobedience

Idaho Legislature

The leader of the Add the Words group and two other gay activists were arrested at the Idaho Capitol late Thursday night after police nixed their plan to hold an all-night vigil inside the building.

That marks the fifth arrest this year for former state Sen. Nicole LeFavour, who heads up the group pushing for the Legislature to add protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity to the Idaho Human Rights Act.

So far, the issue has been denied a hearing by Republican leadership.

Add The Words
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Twenty-three gay rights activists have been arrested after blocking the entrance to Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter's office inside the Idaho Statehouse, the latest in a string of arrests for members of the Add the Words group.

Police say four were charged with trespass, 18 with unlawful assembly and 1 with resisting arrest.

The arrests started Tuesday morning after protesters refused to leave.

protest, capitol
Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

More than 200 people against a bill that would allow permit holders to carry concealed weapons on Idaho's university campuses protested Thursday in the rain outside the Statehouse. The group was made up primarily of students and faculty of Boise State University and the College of Western Idaho.

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