Quirky

No doubt about it: Boiseans have a lot of pride in their city. And sometimes, that place-specific pride can breed timely comedy in the form of internet memes. 

Groundhogs In Idaho (And Around The World)

Feb 2, 2017
Flickr Creative Commons

Groundhog Day has been around for over 30 years, but the tradition itself started in Gobbler's Knob, Punxsutawney in 1886. That year, the local newspaper declared Phil the official weather-forecasting groundhog.

Groundhog Day came from the Roman tradition, Candlemas Day. Originally it was a Pagan holiday. If the sun came out while the clergy blessed the candles, an animal would be able to cast a shadow. This shadow was what predicted six more weeks of winter or an early spring.

103.5 KISSFM Boise / YouTube

The world wide web is just over a quarter century old, but the history behind the latest head-scratching phenomenon making the rounds (and likely to soon be passé if it isn’t already) goes back centuries.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and Archives

If you haven’t heard of FDR’s hour-and-a-half stop in Boise on September 27, 1937, you probably aren’t alone. It was the first and only time he visited the city.

 

Almost 80 years later, there’s a local effort to have the visit formally commemorated. 

The president and his wife arrived by train that morning after a stop in Pocatello the night before and would go on from Boise to dedicate the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. But before they did, they got in an open-roof motorcade and cruised the streets of Boise. 

National Life Group

Wallace, Idaho was once one of the largest and most prosperous towns in the state. Situated beside Interstate 90 west of Coeur d'Alene and less than 100 miles from the Canadian border, the old mining town boomed around the turn of the 20th century. At its height, Wallace miners produced the most silver in the country, earning it the nickname "Silver Capital of the World."

screengrab / National Geographic Channel

Mud baths aren't just for spa-loving humans.

A National Geographic video captured both grizzlies and black bears submerging in what's referred to as a "bear bathtub" in Yellowstone National Park. The natural swimming hole serves as a place for the bears to cool off, take a drink and get squeaky clean.

Cameras placed around the hole recorded the action, giving insight into the iconic predators' behavior.

City of Emmett

Many people in Idaho know the city of Emmett for its annual cherry festival, which draws thousands to the small town every year. But its place on a recently published list is drawing some negative attention.

Dan and Dennis Robbins / via Boise National Weather Service Facebook page

In the world of crazy awesome natural phenomenon, snow doughnuts rank up there.

Also called "snow rollers," the cylindrical snow shapes form when conditions are just right. According to the National Weather Service in Boise, the elements came together just right a couple weeks ago in central Idaho. The frosty shapes stand out on the landscape.

Courtesy of Idaho Fish and Game

File this in your Idaho oddities folder: a hunter killed a mountain lion with a second set of teeth and whiskers growing on top of its head last week. As the Idaho State Journal reports, the year-old animal has Idaho Fish and Game biologists scratching their heads. They have never seen anything like it.

But the scientists do have some theories about what could have caused this abnormal growth.

Bob Dodson

Earlier this year, we told you the story of Idaho Fish and Game parachuting beavers into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in the late 1940’s. Back then, the idea was to trap problem beavers, put them in special boxes and parachute them from a plane. They were sent to remote areas where they could find a new home.

Idaho Fish and Game

Earlier this year, we brought you the story of beavers parachuting into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The story spread like wildfire, complete with pictures of the beavers, tucked inside their travel boxes, parachuting into their new homes.

It turns out there’s more to this story.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

On Friday afternoons, the crowd at the B gates of the Boise Airport includes a lot of familiar faces from the Idaho capitol.

Sen. Bob Nonini knows everybody. He's one of the longest-serving north Idaho lawmakers.

“We got Rep. Don Cheatham, Rep. Ron Mendive, Sen. Mary Souza, Rep. Sage Dixon, Rep. Vito Barbieri, Rep. Heather Scott, Rep. Kathy Sims, and Rep. Eric Redmond,” Nonini said. “And we go home -- most of us -- go home every weekend. And then come back.”

Everyone was in jeans and sneakers, ready to fly to Spokane.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

El Korah Shrine is one of those buildings in downtown Boise people pass by all the time, but probably haven’t ever been in. In the last couple of years, Treefort Music Fest has exposed thousands of people to the venue – giving the old-school fraternal organization some new-found relevance with a younger crowd.  

An Idaho House panel on Thursday passed a spate of bills that would trim certain criminal offenses from Idaho law.

Idaho Fish and Game

More than 60 years ago, Idaho Fish and Game dropped beavers out of a plane and parachuted them into the state's backcountry. This little-known piece of Idaho history stars a crafty Fish and Game officer and a plucky male beaver named Geronimo.

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